Why Is My Head Hot? -- Causes and
Top 7 Natural Remedies
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Last updated August 19, 2016 (originally published February 19, 2016)


By Louise Carr, Associate Editor and Featured Columnist


It’s an alarming feeling. Your head feels like you have a fever
but the thermometer says no – your body temperature is fine.
So why is your head so hot? You may be called
"hot-headed"
but what happens when it’s literally true? Your head feels
warm, it is hot to the touch, or you experience a burning
sensation in your head. What are the reasons for a hot head
and cool body? Is there anything you can do to remedy the
situation?

What Is a Normal Body and Head Temperature?

Your overall body temperature varies throughout the day, but
the average normal body temperature is 98.6°F (37°C).
However, many experts believe that the normal body
temperature actually ranges quite widely around this mark,
from 97°F (36.1°C) to 99°F (37.2°C). If you have a body
temperature of 100.4°F (38°C) or above you normally have a
fever.

The temperature of your head is normally within these
temperature ranges, too. If your head feels excessively hot,
bear in mind that taking temperature with a forehead
thermometer or a plastic strip doesn’t give an accurate measure
of body temperature – it is skin temperature that it reveals. So
you could have a very hot head without having a fever.

What Causes a Hot Head?

There are many possible causes of a hot head and no fever.
You could be suffering from a common symptom of  
menopause, or a chronic pain condition affecting the nerves of
the face. You may have something as simple as a head cold, or
your problem could be caused by
stress or anxiety. Spicy foods
can result in heat in the head, as well as certain types of
headaches.

Also, patients who have suffered a head injury often have a
higher brain temperature than body temperature, according to
a 1998 study from Baylor College of Medicine, Houston – up to
an average 2°F (1.1 °C), in fact.

You probably don’t have a head injury, so what could be
causing your head to feel hot?

We looked at the evidence to give you causes and 7 potentially
effective natural remedies, backed by science.




























1.
Hot Flashes Make Your Head Hot

The typical feeling of warmth that affects postmenopausal
women is often most noticeable in the head and the neck.

Hot flashes can not only cause your head to feel hotter than the
rest of your bod, but can result in flushing or sweating. Hot
flashes usually mean your head is hot for a short period of time.

An extract of rhubarb (not the raw substance, which is toxic
when taken in large quantities) was recently shown to improve
the symptom of hot flashes in menopausal women, according
to a 2006 study from Health Research Services Ltd., St. Leon-
Rot, Germany. Rhubarb contains a phytoestrogenic substance
that helps manage the signs of menopause.
(Read more about
other
heath benefits of rhubarb.)

2.
Trigeminal Neuralgia could be the Cause of a Hot Head  

Trigeminal neuralgia could possibly be the reason for a hot
head, although there are other symptoms that accompany this
painful chronic condition.

Trigeminal neuralgia affects the trigeminal nerve that connects
your face and your brain. Symptoms include a burning feeling
in the face and head, shooting or jabbing pain, aching in the
area where the trigeminal nerve passes through, and pain that
affects one side of the face at a time.

A 2012 study from Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing,
China shows that electroacupuncture which reaches the nerve
adjacent to the affected reduces the intensity and frequency of
pain caused by the condition.

3.
A Hot Head Could Be Caused by Sinusitis

A common case of sinusitis could cause a burning sensation or
hotness in your head.

Sinusitis is a condition caused by a buildup of mucous in your
sinuses which can result in a hot, aching sensation in the head
along with pain, headache, facial discomfort, congestion, and
inner-ear pressure.
Sinusitis can be caused by a virus, bacteria,
irritants such as dust, polyps or a deviated septum. An often
overlooked cause of sinusitis is air pollution.


Eucalyptus oil is said to help thin the mucous in the sinuses and
help relieve pain and heat. A 2004 study from Klink and
Ambulatorium für HNO-Frankeiten, Aachen, Germany found two
100mg tablets of an extract of eucalyptus oil, cineole, taken
three times a day helped to relieve symptoms of sinusitis.

4.
Post-Stroke Pain Results in a Hot Head

After experiencing a stroke, you are also likely to experience
post-stroke pain, which may be due to increased nervous
system activity following the brain injury. It can result in a hot
head and a burning sensation.  

A 2007 study from the College of Oriental Medicine, Wonkwang
University, Iksan, South Korea found that acupressure
combined with aromatherapy using lavender, peppermint and
rosemary oils helped treat post-stroke shoulder pain, but
nothing has been specifically tested against head pain.

5.
Stress May Cause a Hot Head

Stress has a far-reaching effect on your body, and many people
experience the signs of stress in their head – a feeling or
warmth, maybe combined with a headache, or a burning
sensation.

Somewhat surprisingly, a 2000 study from the Nelson R
Mandela School of Medicine, University of Natal, Durban, South
Africa, shows that multivitamin and mineral tablets can actually
help lower levels of anxiety and improve the ability to cope with
stress. (Read more about
foods that help to lower stress
hormone levels.)

6.
Stop a Hot Head Caused by Spicy Food

For many people, eating a hot Indian curry or a spicy Thai dish
sends heat shooting straight to their head.

Barry Green of John B. Pierce Laboratory in New Haven states
that spicy foods have an effect on the skin receptors that are
normally affected by heat – these receptors not only respond
to heat but to chemical influence such as a spicy chili.

If you feel too hot when you eat spicy foods, cut the burn by
consuming yogurt or ice cream, or put some salt or sugar on
your tongue.

7.
Migraines Can Cause in a Hot Head

If you suffer from migraines you may also suffer from a hot
feeling in the head, either during the attack or prior to the
onset of the headache.

Butterbur is said to help prevent migraines. A 2000 study from
the Municipal Hospital in München-Harlaching, Germany shows
that butterbur extract reduced the frequency of migraine along
with the severity of attacks when taken for at least four weeks.

















































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Extract of eucalyptus can help cool a hot
head caused by sinusitis.
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