Why Is My Blood Pressure So Low?
--- Causes and Top 7 Natural
Remedies
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Last updated May 2, 2017


By Ariadne Weinberg, Featured Columnist

[Health and fitness articles are reviewed by our team of
Doctors and Registered Nurses, Certified fitness trainers and
other members of our Editorial Board.]







As a person who feels cold a lot, and gets a little foggy some
of the time, I wonder if it's due to low blood pressure. (I
haven't gotten it tested for a while, and it could also be a
symptom of
thyroid issues.)

So, how do you know for sure? Ask yourself the following:
Are you feeling fatigue, nausea, difficulty breathing or
blurred vision?  These symptoms, as well as palpitations and
clammy-feeling skin, might be signs of low blood pressure.

However, there's only one way to have a scientific reading of
your state. Get your blood pressure tested, and see if it
reads 90/60 or below.

Sometimes low blood pressure happens circumstantially, or
in tandem with something else, and is not chronic. My blood
pressure has dropped and I've almost blacked out while
experiencing a migraine, as well as after a day of sun and
alcohol in the early morning. This doesn't mean you'll need
regular remedies for your blood pressure; simply a quick fix.

However, if you are diagnosed with chronic hypotension,
you will need to ask a doctor about what is the best solution
for you.

In the meanwhile, you can browse this list of low blood
pressure remedies, some more suited for chronic issues,
some better for a quick fix. All, pretty delicious, in my humble
opinion.


























1.
Try Licorice Root

If you are North American, you may have experienced
licorice principally in the form of those chewy, stringy
candies. (The black ones had a more real “licorice” taste and
were a little too strong for many kids.)

Licorice root tends to heal hypotension issues caused due to
low levels of cortisol and a dysfunction of the adrenal gland.
A 2005 report from C.L. Richard and researchers from the
Dalhousie University in Nova Scotia, Canada, confirmed the
effectiveness of licorice root to help people with low blood
pressure. Richard and researchers searched in various
electronic medical databases that collected information from
between the years 1965 and 2004, to define the effects of
natural health products on blood pressure. The studies,
which contained case reports and defined mechanisms of
action, provided strong evidence for the ability of licorice to
increase blood pressure.

You should, of course, talk to your physician about your
particular case, because in some cases, licorice may cause
hypertension, if your blood pressure is only slightly low. If
you get the go-ahead, you can try licorice root in the form of
tea (steep 1 teaspoon of the herb in a cup of boiling water
for five minutes) or capsules (400-500 milligrams a day or
whatever your doctor prescribes).



2.
Use Rosemary in Your Dishes (Or Inhale Rosemary)

Okay, so rosemary is delicious in almost everything savory
and also smells amazing. This would be my go-to low-blood
pressure med of choice, hands down.

Rosmarinus officinalis improves circulation and stimulates the
central nervous system. Gloria Frutos, from the Universidad
Complutense de Madrid, can confirm rosemary's
effectiveness. In 2014, she and colleagues did a study of 32
patients diagnosed with hypotension, who were recruited
between March 2007 and September 2008. They were given
a clinical evaluation, which was carried out through control
of systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels, according to
international standards from the American Society of
Hypertension.

Frutos and researchers discovered that rosemary essential
oil had a clinically significant antihypotensive effect on both
systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure.

You can add 10 milligrams of rosemary extract to food or
drinks, if you want to reap the benefits. Using the plant for
aromatherapy by using a diffuser with rosemary is also an
option.  
(Read more about the surprising health benefits of
rosemary
.)



3.
Drink Coffee

If you're a regular reader of my articles, you'll know that a
lot of them tell you to avoid caffeine. Here's one that gives
you the go-ahead. Yay! However, take this one in due
context. If you generally have normal blood pressure and
you find that you are more hypotensive just recently or
during certain incidents, that java juice might be the thing
for you.

When I blacked out a little due to hypotension, coffee
brought me back up to a functional level, so I can vouch for
this one. Of course, coffee sometimes not only solves your
short-term hypotension; the cup of joe may also be the
reason for the feeling of low blood pressure. Huh? Well, like
going off any drug cold-turkey, if you decide that you're
going to stop doing something immediately, without gradual
change, that sometimes has repercussions.

If you are a regular coffee drinker and stop being one, your
blood pressure will be lower. Now, if you have extremely
high blood pressure to begin with, that’s fine; however, if
not, you may want to consider cutting down instead of
cutting out. In 1989, A.A. Bak, from Erasmus University
Medical School in Rotterdam tested the long-term effects of
coffee on blood pressure, using two common brewing
methods. The subjects were 107 young normotensives who
participated for 12 weeks. Group one consumed 4-6 cups of
filtered coffee per day, group two 4-6 cups of boiled coffee
per day, and group 3 no coffee for a period of 9 weeks. In
the third group, they found that the there was a drop in
systolic blood pressure of 4.9 mmHg.

Moral of the story? If you cut out coffee, do so gradually or
have some lightly caffeinated tea. Also,  remember to not
rely on caffeine as a solution for chronic hypotension, but
use the drink as a quick fix.

4.
Eat Grapes and Raisins

I know raisins are not a universal taste. I am a fan of them,
plain, and in sweets. Consuming grapes as an extract or as
the plain fruit can also work. A 2015 report by S.H. Li at the
Shandong Provincial Hospital in Jinan, China contains an
interesting analysis of the power of grapes: Li and
colleagues looked at ten studies compiled from the PubMed,
Embase, and Cochrane Library databases.

They found that daily grape polyphenol intake could
normalize your blood pressure.

A daily natural hypotension cure is grape water: Take 20-35
raisins, and put them in a bowl of water to soak overnight.
Consume the soaked raisins on an empty stomach the next
morning, and don’t eat anything until about one hour
afterwards. Try this for a few weeks to a couple months and
see if you become more normotensive.

5.
Drink Way More Water

You don’t have to drink water with grapes, you can imbibe
the H20 plain. In their 2010 study, E. Jequier and
researchers from the University of Lausanne in Pully,
Switzerland, confirmed that dehydration can sometimes
affect orthostatic hypotension (low blood pressure while
standing up).

On average, a sedentary healthy adult should drink 1.5 liters
of water per day. Ideally, you wouldn’t be sedentary. Even if
you walk around without officially working out, you have
some activity. If that’s the case, try 2-3 liters instead.

6.
Have Some Chips

One of my go-to quick fixes when my blood pressure feels
low is a bag of chips and a little chocolate. Healthy? Nope.
Functional? Yep. More because of the salt than anything else.
Like coffee, you’ll want to use this for sporadic episodes of
hypotension; not if you have chronic low blood pressure.
The World Health Organisation recommends one teaspoon of
added salt, apart from what you naturally get from fruits and
veggies, on the daily.  The salt water or bag of potato chips
would only be in extreme cases. A fun pick-me-up is lime
with salt, if you are feeling the negative effects of
hypotension. No tequila required.

7.
Cook with Holy Basil

Holy basil is also called tulsi, which means “the incomparable
one.”

Frankly, the herb is pretty incomparable, given the amount
of health benefits it has. In a 2014 report, M.M. Cohen from
the RMIT University in Victoria, Australia, confirms that
normalization of blood pressure is one of them.

You can add the herb to your food or crush it up with
warmed up coconut oil to make an essential oil. In addition
to a cure to hypotension, the holy plant cures infections,
too.  






































Related:
High Blood Pressure - Top 10 Natural Remedies

High Blood Pressure During Pregnancy-Causes and Cures  

Hardened or Stiff Arteries - Foods That Help

Foods That Reduce Blood Pressure

Sugar-the Disease Connection

Urine Color-What It Means


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