Why Am I Always Cold? --- Causes
and Top 10 Natural Remedies

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May 18, 2012, last updated June 20, 2016

By Alison Turner, Contributing Columnist





Do you feel cold all the time? Some of us know what it's like.
We're the ones who need the windows closed or the
thermostat turned up.  Some of us know what it´s like, and
some of us stare at the phenomenon with curiosity; some of us
cram scarves, sweaters, and hats into purses and backpacks
regardless of the season or where we´re going, and others
strut outside in a T-shirt without checking the weather; some
of us feel cold all the time, no matter what, and to others the
idea of wearing a sweater in that sweltering office is the picture
of absurdity.

Indeed, an article posted by CNN in 2005 reported that in an
average office environment, only 80% of the employees feel
comfortable (in terms of temperature).  What´s going on with
the other 20%?

How Is It Possible to Feel Cold When the Thermometer says
"Hot"?  

Our bodies have a thermostat center, perhaps much like the
one in your office building (for better or for worse).  It is
called our "hypothalamus", located at the base of the brain,
which gives direction to the thyroid gland.  


In turn, the thyroid gland produces hormones that regulate
basal metabolic rate, determining the speed at which our
bodies burn food for energy (see below).     

Our metabolism and body temperatures are directly related. For
example, if we step out of doors in the middle of Boston winter
in a T-shirt, the skin ¨tells¨ the hypothalamus about this
temperature change, which in turn tells the thyroid gland to
increase metabolism in order to create more heat.   

And here´s the catch --- everyone´s ¨thermostat¨ system is
different.  Women, for example, have more irregular body
temperature systems because of menstrual cycles and
menopause, and also because they tend to have less dense
muscle than men.  

Check out the list below of 10 more reasons (all supported by
recent research from experts) why you might be the lonely cold
soul in that room full of obnoxiously comfortable people.




























1.
Skipping Meals Can Make You Feel Cold

Did you  know that skipping meals can make you colder?
Because we don't have enough time or because of religion,
distraction, or extreme fad diets, some of us may, from time to
time, skip a meal here or there.

While skipping an occasional meal may not seem like such a big
deal (or maybe it does, depending on the circumstances), it
could be to blame for your seemingly unusual feelings of cold.  
Sometimes, if the body thinks it is “fasting” (even if this “fast”
is one meal long), the body produces less heat in an attempt to
conserve energy.

Here's why.

In 2011, a study conducted by researchers from various Italian
institutions and the Washington University School of medicine,
including Dr. Luigi Fontana with the Division of Nutrition and
Aging at the Istituto Superiore de Sanita in Rome,  confirmed
the connection between calorie restriction such as fasting and
low body temperature.  

Their study include 24 participants, who consumed a calorie
restricted diet for an average of six years, as well as 24 “age
and sex-matched sedentary” volunteers, who ate Western
diets.  Mean measurements of day and night core body
temperatures were “significantly lower in the [calorie
restricted] group than in the [Western diet] group.”  The
report concludes that long term calorie reduction is “associated
with a sustained reduction in core body temperature.”

If you don’t like to feel cold all the time, you may want to
consider
changing your eating habits.  Some foods can help to
heat you up.

These foods, called "thermogenic foods", include hot peppers
and protein.  Protein raises your calorie expenditure --and
therefore your temperature -- by up to 15% above normal,
according to a 2004 study led by Dr. Klaus Westerterp of
Maastricht University in the Netherlands. Fat has almost the
opposite effect.

Make sure that you both get enough total calories, and that you
don’t skip meals (which might make your body think you’re
“fasting).  Keep in mind that fat and muscle help to keep us
warm , so that you don’t have to sacrifice a healthy, slim figure
in order to ward off the cold.

2.
Lack of Sleep Can Make You Feel Cold

You’re busy, you’re stressed, you’re not getting enough sleep
– and now suddenly you’re cold all the time, too?  It turns out
that these symptoms may be related.  The way that we sleep,
particularly the way that we wake up, could be to blame for
unusual feelings of cold.
In 2010, experts from various institutions in the Netherlands,
including Maan Van de Werken with the Department of
Chronobiology at the University of Groningen,  analyzed a
specific type of sleep deprivation and its involvement in
thermoregulatory processes (body heat).  

Sixteen participants were exposed to “artificial dawn”, which
could dissipate “sleep inertia,” and core body temperature and
skin temperature were measured in multiple intervals up to
ninety minutes after waking.  Results showed that artificial
dawn “accelerated” the decrease in skin temperature after
waking.  

If you have an “artificial dawn” of your own, that is, something
waking you up before your body wants to wake up, and you
can change it, try to do so (perhaps closing the blinds at night
or unplugging the phone).  

Of course, many causes of “artificial dawn,” say, children
hungry for breakfast, or a work shift that starts at 7am, are not
so easily avoided.  In any case, if you can’t figure out why you’
re feeling cold all the time, do the best you can to get enough
sleep.

3.
High Blood Pressure, Cold, and Salt.

Most of us have heard the lecture on
high blood pressure (also
known as hypertension) before, and most of us hear only the
bottom line: bad, bad, bad.  

Hypertension is bad because it could lead to stroke;
hypertension is bad because it could lead to heart attack;and
hypertension is bad because it could lead to kidney disease.  

Well folks, here’s another one: because in hypertension the
blood flows with difficulty so that only a small amount of blood
may reach the extremities, hypertension is bad because it could
lead to cold hands and feet. (Read more about
what your blood
pressure should be at different ages.)

You’ve probably heard it before, but here’s yet another study
that confirms the awful news: a low sodium diet may reduce
blood pressure.  This particular study, conducted in 2009 by
researchers from various Australian institutions as well as the
University of Alabama, including Dr. Eduardo Pimenta with the
Hypertension Unit at the Princess Alexandra Hospital in
Brisbane,  examined how dietary salt restriction affected the
blood pressure of twelve people who already had
hypertension.  

Results indicated that “excessive dietary sodium ingestion
contributes importantly to resistance to hypertensive
treatment,” so that reducing salt intake should be a part of  
your treatment against high blood pressure.

Cold hands and feet may seem a trivial symptom of high blood
pressure, in comparison with stroke, heart attack, or kidney
disease: then again, it may be the small things finally convince
us to change.

4.
How’s Your Immune System? If it´s Bad, Stop Smoking.  

Our immune system is crucial to our everyday health, and its
weakening could influence more than we may think.  A
weakened immune system could even produce cold feelings in
our hands and feet.   If we want to keep our immune systems
strong, one of the best things we can do, according to research
from 2009, is to stop smoking.

In 2009 Mishra Jitendra with the Grand Valley State University
in Grand Rapids, Michigan, and colleagues,  conducted a study
in response to the statement that “smoking causes a weak
immune system because of the carcinogen found in the
cigarettes.”  

Compiling several studies, the team states that smokers use
more sick days than non-smokers (a large U.S. airline, for
example, found that smokers missed work an average of over 6
days a year, compared with under 4 days per year for non-
smokers), and that smoking employees are less productive
largely because of smoke breaks (four ten minute smoke
breaks each day results in one month less of work per year
than workers who don’t smoke).  

The study concludes that smokers are “more absent, more
prone to sickness, and are less productive compared to non-
smokers.”

Your employment status may be more important to you than
cold hands and feet – but why not potentially ameliorate both
problems at once, by putting down that cigarette?


5.
Do You Have Hypothyroidism?

Continue reading        page 1        page 2













































Related:
Bad Circulation -Top 10 Causes and Remedies

Foods That Lower Blood Pressure  

Foods That Help You Control Blood Sugar

Arteries-How to Keep Them Healthy

/ Healing Foods/ Anemia-Top 10 Foods That Fight Anemia
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