White Eye Discharge --- Causes and
Top
7 Natural Remedies
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January 21, 2017
By Ariadne Weinberg, Featured Columnist






It’s terrible when you wake up in the morning and your eyes feel
stuck together. “What happened?! Have I gone blind?!” You go
to the mirror and see something white oozing out of them. “What
have I done?!
Noooooooo!”  


Usually, having white discharge is not too serious, something that
will pass with simple home remedies, some attention to proper
body maintenance, and, in some cases, outside medications.  


What Exactly Causes White Eye Discharge?

The thing with white eye discharge is that it is a symptom that
could have a host of causes. This, of course, means that you
should go to your eye doctor to find out what’s up.

Here are a few possibilities:

Dry eye syndrome.  This condition is often caused by
dehydration, a general decrease in tear production due to
unbalanced hormones, or exposure to cigarette smoke. In this
case, your discharge might manifest as little white balls of eye
mucus.

Tear Duct Inflammation. When the appearance of your eye goo is
more stringy, the cause could be "dacryocystitis", an
inflammation in the tear duct.

Bacterial Infection.  If your eye discharge is yellow-white, it’s
likely a bacterial infection.


Conjunctivitis. Conjunctivitis, more commonly known as "pink
eye", could also be a culprit. This common eye attacker can either
be infectious or noninfectious. Conjunctivitis may be caused by
the
common cold or a herpes simplex I virus.

Eyelid Inflammation.  It’s also a possibility that your white eye
discharge might not originate in the eye at all, but rather on your
eyelids. Blepharitis is the inflammation of the rims of the eyelids
of both eyes.  



Sometimes eye discomfort can't be traced to one illness so easily,
but is provoked by outside factors, such as sun exposure, dry
environments, and allergic reactions. It’s worth it to check what’s
around you and see how your environment could be affecting
your eyes.  



Whew. So, those are a lot of possible causes. Don’t worry. We’ll
provide you with some natural quick fixes, backed by scoence,
that apply to most all of these problems.



































1.
Use a Warm Cloth or Cold Compress  

  
The first thing is to reduce the discomfort, confirms Dr. Jill
Swartz, practicing physician at GoHealth Urgent Care. She
recommends using a cold compress in order to relieve allergic
conjunctivitis.

In the case of viral or bacterial pinkeye, a warm compress is
better. Swartz says to wipe your eyes several times as day as
needed. Consult with your doctor after finding out the cause of
your white discharge which option is better: hot or cold.  



2.
Hydrate Just Enough  


This advice is especially relevant to dry eye syndrome. However,
it applies to anyone, and is a good way to reduce the severity of
your condition.

In a 2015 study performed by J.C. Sherwin and colleagues at the
Royal Victorian Ear and Eye Hospital, they examined how
variation in systematic hydration status, either chronic systemic
hypohydration or dehydration, can influence the eyes.

The scientists performed a systematic review of the current
evidence with changes in hydration and it’s relation with ocular
physiology and morphological characteristics. They also looked at
relevant clinical correlations of changes in hydration and major
common eye diseases. The researchers confirmed that
dehydration was associated with the development of dry eye
syndrome. So, drink on up.  



3.
Put Tea Bags on Your Eyes (especially green tea bags)  


Tea can be especially good to put on your eyes, when trying to
reduce inflammation and in some cases to lessen the effects of a
bacterial condition.

Researchers have been looking particularly at the potential of
green tea’s antimicrobial effects.

Just how beneficial are  the leaves of that camellia sinensis plant,
they wonder.

Any tea will do the trick to temporarily calm your eyes (it’s not
necessarily the end solution, but it’s a good first step), but green
tea could be especially helpful, given it’s proven antimicrobial
benefits, due to catechins. There are four main catechins in green
tea include:  (-)-epicatechin (EC), (-)-epicatechin-3-gallate
(ECG), (-)-epigallocatechin (EGC), and (-)-epigallocatechin-3-
gallate (EGCG).

Three of these compounds have been shown to have strong
antimicrobial effects. According to a report by Wana C. Reygaert
from the Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine
in Rochester, Michigan, several studies have demonstrated that
green tea’s antimicrobial effects have potential for preventative
and therapeutic purposes.

So, when your eye gets goopy, try a little green tea bag over it to
stave off stronger effects.



4.
Apply Drops of Honey  to Scare Off Bacteria


Honey is another ingredient you can use to scare off bacteria.
Even if your eye problem isn’t bacterial, honey is safe and can
help in instances of tear deficiency and other kinds of dry eye, as
well.

Stone Age paintings from the Araña Caves near Barcelona show
that we humans have been using honey for over 8,000 years.

In a 2006 study conducted by Julie M. Albietz at the Queensland
University of Technology in Brisbane, Australia, she and
colleagues assessed honey’s anti-bacterial effect on ocular flora
in certain forms of dry eye.

They studied various kinds of dry eye and took samples after one
and three months. In the first month the bacteria remained
isolated in the eyelid margin and conjunctiva. At the third month,
the bacteria was all cured up. This and other studies confirm
honey’s potential to heal your eyes.

To make a homemade honey cure, mix several tablespoons of
honey in a cup of water, boil for one minute, and let the solution
cool down. Then put several drops of solution into your eye with
an eye dropper. Make completely sure that the solution is
completely cooled and that the eye dropper is clean.  



5.
Apply Aloe Vera  


Aloe vera seems like a cure for everything, right? Sun burns, nice
skin, all kinds of ways.  Think of aloe vera as a good plant tool.

It turns out that eyes can benefit from aloe vera, as well.

Sometimes doctors  prescribe eye drops to people with dry eye or
antibacterial issues and if the eye drops don't prove effective for
the patient, they will recommend aloe vera.

It’s important to just put in a just a small amount of aloe vera, as
a lot of it might further irritate your eyes.

After testing aloe vera’s effect on corneal cells in 2012, A.
Wozniak and researchers from the Medical University of Lublin in
Poland,  determined that the plant was not toxic and actually
beneficial to the cornea cells.

The scientists concluded that aloe vera has pharmacologically
active substances that are good for treating inflammations and
cornea-based eye conditions. They also promoted the idea of
making eye drops with aloe vera. So, if you want to search for a
product on the market or add a little of the gel of your favorite
aloe vera plant to your eye, go for it. Just remember to ask a
doctor’s permission first, and apply in a small quantity.



6.
Herbal Eye Drops, Especially with Turmeric, Clear Up
Discharge
 


Turmeric, also known as "Curcuma longa", is another great
antibacterial agent.

Mix tumeric with other herbs to achieve even better results.

In 2001, Dr. N.R. Biswas and scientists at the All India Institute
of Medical Sciences in New Delhi, India, looked at a product called
OphthaCare and its effects on various eye conditions including  
conjunctivitis, conjunctival xerosis (dry eye), acute dacryocystitis,
degenerative conditions (pterygium or pinguecula) and
postoperative cataract state.

The ingredients of Ophthacare include curcumin and other
ingredients. Specifically, the mix includes Carum copticum,
Terminalia bellirica, Emblica officinalis, Curcuma longa, Ocimum
sanctum, Cinnamomum camphora, Rosa damascena and models
puma pum.

All the herbs listed are anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial. The
product was well-tolerated and the eyedrop had a useful role in a
variety of infective, inflammatory, and degenerative opthamologic
disorders.

Ask your doctor if there is a solution with turmeric you can make
yourself, or if Ophthacare and similar products are available near
you.  





7.
Breast Milk  Helps to Clear Up Eye Discharge?


Okay, this one is so weird, I had to include it. But really, breast
milk does a heck of a job on viral conjunctivitis.

While breast milk as an eye remedy has mostly been used on
babies (because adults have some hangups about those things,
probably), you could probably try it. However, regardless of the
type of eye disorder, if it’s for you or your baby, consult your
physician.

"Breast milk has been used by mothers (probably for many
years) to treat infectious conjunctivitis, but hold off on this idea
until you speak with your doctor," says Debbi Donovan, a board
certified lactation consultant.  












































Continue reading >> Eye Health:

Eat for Eye Health

Remove Dark Eye Circles

Stye In Your Eye-Top Remedies

Swollen Eyelids-Causes and Remedies

Whites of Your Eyes-Remedies for Red,Yellow, Gray and Brown Eyes

Why Do I Feel Like I'm Crying? -Causes and 7 Natural Remedies

How High Blood Pressure Affects Your Eyes
Smoke Gets In Your Eyes-Lingering Health Dangers from Volcanic Ash

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Honey in warm water can help to heal eye
ear ducts and clear up bacteria that cause
white discharge
.