Top 10 Foods Rich in Vitamin E
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August 20, 2012, last updated April 8, 2015
By Amber Reeves, Contributing Columnist











Vitamin E is a fat-soluble antioxidant that lives in our cell
membranes. A combination of eight different compounds,
Vitamin E protects our cells from damage caused by external
and internal stresses. According to a study by the American
Medical Association published in 1997, Vitamin E plays a role in
neurological function and the immune system.

Vitamin E is available from plant sources such as fruits and
vegetables and their oils. The American Heart Association
recommends these natural sources of the antioxidant over
supplements until further research is completed on the
consequences of synthetic vitamin supplementation.  Vitamin E
is, however, commercially available over the counter in capsule
or liquid form. Capsules can be taken by mouth while liquid
Vitamin E is beneficial when applied topically to dry or damaged
skin and hair.

However, despite the availability of Vitamin E as a supplement,
medical experts advise that the very best way to get your
Vitamin E is naturally through foods. Which foods are high in
Vitamin E? Which spices and herbs are rich in Vitamin E?

Why You Need Vitamin E

Vitamin E has many benefits when consumed in moderate
doses. There is no shortage of scientific data to support the
positive claims of this antioxidant.

A 2012 study by the National Cancer Institute states that
Vitamin E lowers the risk of the onset of particular cancers
while The Center for Cancer Prevention Research proved that it
may also help fight existing cancers (2012).

The Channing Laboratory in Boston, Massachusettes confirmed
that Vitamin E lowers the risk of coronary disease in women
(1993) and Colombia University reported the positive effects of
Vitamin E on Alzheimer’s patients (1997).

The Centre for Eye Research at the University of Melbourne in
Australia has also had luck with Vitamin E; this time the
substance lowered the risk of age-related macular
degeneration, or the loss of eyesite, by 20% (2007).

The American Academy of Dermatology has reported the
reverse effects of Vitamin E on sun-damaged skin as well as its
contribution to hair and nail health (2010).

Vitamin E Helps Protects Your Lungs from Pneumonia

Now, researchers have discovered that Vitamin E can help to
protect our lungs from pneumonia. Several studies have
discovered the link between Vitamin E intake and lowered
incidence of pneumonia. In 2011, a study from the University
of Helsinki in Finland discovered that Vitamin E (200 to 400 IU
per day) reduced the incidence of Pneumonia by 69% in people
who were non-smokers and physically active.  But here's the
kicker --Vitamin E worked the opposite way in smokers who
were sedentary. In that group, Vitamin E actually increased
their risk for pneumonia by 79%.

So if Vitamin E is so good for us, how much of it should we be
taking?

How Much Vitamin E is Recommended?

There is controversy surrounding the amount of Vitamin E that
is safe and beneficial for human intake. The Food Standards
Agency in the United Kingdom cite a John Hopkins University
study (1993-2004) as proof that doses over 270mg (400 IU)
per day increase the risk of death by 10%. The UK officially
recommends a very moderate 3-4mg (4.5-6 IU) daily intake of
Vitamin E to reap its benefits without putting oneself at risk.
The United States’ Food and Nutrition Board, however,
suggests a higher dose of 15mg (22.4 IU) daily for adults.
The best way to get what your body needs without the
confusion is to eat your vitamins! Mother nature has provided
plenty of ways to naturally fuel, supplement, and care for your
daily needs.

Here are the top ten foods that will supply you with all the
Vitamin E you’ll need for healthy skin, eyes, bones, and heart:

Top Ten Foods High in Vitamin E




























1.        Sunflower Seeds – Sunflower seeds pack 76% of the
USDA’s recommended daily dose of Vitamin E. These tiny bites
are  the richest whole food source of the antioxidant.

The United States Department of Agriculture reported in 2003
that the Vitamin E and “healthy fats” found in sunflower seeds
may help prevent heart disease. Eat them alone as a snack or
sprinkle them on salads for a crunchy, healthy boost!

2.        
Almonds – Nuts are so good in so many ways, and
almonds are the antioxidant powerhouse. The Journal of
Nutrition published a study in 2005 showing that when the
Vitamin E found in almond meat is eaten together with the
flavonoids found in their skin, we get double the anti-aging
properties than when eating either alone.

So eat your almonds whole and your mother’s crow’s feet may
not creep up on you quite as fast!

3.        
Leafy Greens – Spinach, swiss chard, mustard greens,
and collard greens are all full of vitamins, minerals, and
antioxidants, and are brimming with Vitamin E. The Journal of
Neuroscience published a study in 1998 claiming that the high
Vitamin E concentration in spinach is able to slow aging in the
brain and may have positive effects on those suffering from
degenerative mental disorders like Alzheimer’s disease. So
make a salad or a add greens to a burger or sandwich and stay
sharp as a tack!

4.        
Papaya – The sweet, juicy fruit of the papaya plant
provides 11.1% of the daily recommended dosage of Vitamin E.
According to the Archives of Opthamology (2007), the Vitamin
E found in the papaya plant is helpful in staving off blindness.
Your eyes need nutrients too, so cut up some papaya and
enjoy it with cottage cheese or put it on the grill in the summer
for a sweet and crispy treat! (Read more about the
ideal diet
for eye health.)

5.        
Peppers –The European Prospective Investigation in
Cancer and Nutrition in Spain conducted a study on nutrients in
plant foods, showing the bell pepper’s high concentration of
Vitamin E (2004).  

A 2007 Turkish study adds that cooking peppers at high
temperatures destroys their anti-inflammatory properties and
vitamin content. So slice ‘em up and eat ‘em raw for a crunchy
dose of skin and hair protection.

6.        
Tomatoes – Tomatoes are a “superfood” in every sense
of the word. They are known to contain just about every
vitamin and mineral humans need for optimal health.

A study by the Department of Human Nutrition at the University
of Otago in New Zealand described the ways in which the
Vitamin E contained in tomatoes is actually more effective at
preventing heart attacks in diabetes patients than Vitamin E
supplements (2000).

Tomato sauce poured over pasta or fresh tomatoes on a
summer salad are excellent ways to make your food into
superfood!

7.        
Vegetable oil – Vegetable oil is a healthier alternative to
butter and margarine, packing a lot of Vitamin E with less
calories and “bad fats”. The Center for Cancer Prevention
Research study of 2012 states that the Vitamin E found in
vegetable oil is beneficial in preventing cancers and in stopping
them from growing. Corn, soya bean, and canola oils are
excellent sources of Vitamin E that can be used in baking,
cooking, and as a source of healthy unsaturated fats. Go easy
on the oil, however, because it is loaded with calories.

8.        
Spices – Spices, particularly paprika, curry powder,
cloves, ginger, and chili pepper, are so high in Vitamin E that a
study published in the American Journal of Respiratory and
Critical Care Medicine (June 2006) proves that they lower the
risk of asthma in children when consumed by pregnant women.
(Read more about
natural remedies for asthma attacks.)

The Vitamin E in these spices also aids in the production of red
blood cells for the mother and the baby. Rub steak or pork with
paprika and chili pepper for a spicy dinner, or add ground
ginger and curry to a veggie sautee. For easy Vitamin E, spice
up your life!

9.        
Herbs – Herbs and spices are best friends. They share
everything…like loads of Vitamin E! The Council for Responsible
Nutrition discovered the high Vitamin E concentration in dried
basil and oregano significantly reduced the risk of dementia.
Those people studied without dementia also saw improved
cognitive abilities (2000). Mix basil and oregano into tomato
sauce for a triple threat of Vitamin E! (Read more about
natural
remedies for dementia.)

10.        
Dried apricots – According to the American College of
Nutrition, many dried fruits contain higher nutrient
concentrations than their fresh counterparts, and dried apricots
are the highest on the list. A rich source of Vitamin E, dried
apricots were one of the winning ingredients tested by the
Shanghai Cancer Institute for reducing the risk of liver cancer.
Eat dried fruit alone as an easy snack or add to salads for a
sweet bite!




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Alzheimer's Disease -An Ideal Prevention Diet/

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