Continued from page 1

Type 2 Diabetes --- Causes and Top
10 Natural Remedies

February 3, 2013, last updated June 25, 2016


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7. Lasso in Your High Blood Sugar with  Low-Glycemic Index
Foods.

If your blood sugar is too high, or you have troubles managing
your glucose levels because of Type 2 diabetes and you don’t
want to exercise (see above), there are dietary changes that
you can make to help stabilize your blood sugar.  

The
low glycemic index diet, for example, is a way of eating
that was originally designed to improved blood sugar control.  
The glycemic index classifies carbohydrates according to their
potential to raise a person’s blood sugar level.   

According to research out of Toronto, following a low-glycemic
index diet is a great way to keep your blood sugar down.

In 2008, DJ Jenkins and other scientists with the Clinical
Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Center at St. Michael’s
Hospital in Toronto,  analyzed how a low-glycemic index diet
affected glycemic control and heart-health in 210 patients with
Type 2 diabetes.  After six months of treatment with a low-
glycemic index diet, patients resulted in “lower HbA (1c) levels
(the HbA(1c) is a lab test that shows blood sugar levels over
the previous three months ).

If you worry about hyperglycemia and want to try the low-
glycemic index diet, where’s a good place to start?  

You could start by replacing foods with a high (70 and up)
glycemic index, such as white bread, white and brown rice and
baked potatoes, with foods with a low glycemic index (55 and
under) such as raw carrots, peanuts, skim milk, and kidney
beans.  Ask a nutritionist or your doctor for more specifics.
(Read more about  
low glycemic index foods.)

8.  
Try the Livelier Mediterranean Diet for Blood Sugar
Management



























If you want to help manage your blood sugar via your diet but
the idea of researching glycemic index numbers for every bite
you take (see above) stresses you out, there are other dietary
options.  

The Mediterranean diet, for example, may be a livelier way to
cook off your high blood sugar, with its emphasis on fruits and
vegetables, a glass of wine from time to time, and, according to
the Mayo Clinic, “enjoying meals with family and friends.”   

The Mediterranean diet has often been attributed to good heart
health – now, thanks to researchers in Naples, we know that it
may also help with the management of Type 2 diabetes.

In 2009, a group of experts including Dr. Maiorino Ciotola with
the Department of Geriatrics and Metabolic Diseases at the
Second University of Naples  looked into how a Mediterranean-
style diet affected the need for antihyperglycemic drugs in
patients with newly-diagnosed type 2 diabetes.  215
overweight people with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes were
put on either a Mediterranean-style diet (wherein less than
50% of calories consumed were carbohydrates) or a low-fat
diet (wherein less than 30% of daily calories came from fat).  

After 4 years, only 44% of patients following the
Mediterranean-style diet requirement drug treatment, versus
70% of people who followed the low-fat diet.  Furthermore,
participants following the Mediterranean-style diet lost more
weight, and “experienced greater improvements in some
glycemic control and coronary risk measures.”  

The team concluded that a low-carbohydrate, Mediterranean-
style diet “led to more favorable changes in glycemic control
and coronary risk factors and delayed the need for anti-
hyperglycemic drug therapy in overweight patients with newly
diagnosed type 2 diabetes.”

There are a few small dietary changes you can start making
now if you’re not ready to jump into a new diet all at once (no
matter how much fun it may seem):  the Mediterranean diet
replaces butter with healthy fats like olive oil, for example, and
uses herbs and spices instead of salt to flavor foods.

9.
Sugar Sweetened Beverages: A Diabetic No-No.

There are so many healthy choices we have to make every day
that sometimes all we want to do is sit back and sip a soda.  

Don’t do it!

Recent research finds that sugar sweetened beverages, such as
pop and sweetened fruit juice, are particularly bad for our risk
of type 2 diabetes.

In 2012, Emily Sonestedt with the Department of Clinical
Sciences at Lund University in Sweden, along with other
researchers from Norway, Finland, and Iceland, assessed how
sugar intake from sugar-sweetened beverages was related to
Type 2 diabetes.  The team found a “significant positive
association for sugar-sweetened beverage intake” and type 2
diabetes.

Next time you need to take a break from your health and diet
planning, kick back with a nice cool glass of…water.  Or non-
sweetened ice tea.  Or milk.  Anything but pop!  (Read more
about the
health dangers of drinking even diet soda.)

10.
Follow the Doctor's Orders.

People with Type 2 diabetes may end up with an intimidating
list of medications, when to take them, and how to deal with
the side effects.  Following the advice of specialists in managing
Type 2 diabetes is no easy chore but, according to experts, it is
a very important one: that is, if you don’t want type 2 diabetes
to get the best of you, you should probably trust that the
doctor knows best.

In 2012, Dr. Craig Currie with the Department of Medicine at
Cardiff University in Wales  led a team of researchers from
Cardiff and Maryland, and Denmark in assessing how
compliance with treatment impacted mortality in over 15,000
insulin-treated patients with type 2 diabetes.  

Noncompliance was defined as “Missing more than one
scheduled visit or having at least one provider code for not
taking medications as prescribed.”  

Results showed that medication noncompliance and clinic
nonattendance were “independent risk factors for all-cause
mortality” in patients with Type 2 diabetes treated with insulin.

Accepting that Type 2 diabetes will change your life is a
realization that may not come easily for some patients: if you
have a loved one struggling with the management of Type 2
diabetes, they may need all the help and support they can get.


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Related:

Ideal Breakfasts for Diabetics

Foods That Lower Blood Sugar -Natural Insulin Foods

Teeth Bleeding? -It Could Raise Your Diabetes Risk

Does Drinking Coffee Affect Diabetes -A Comprehensive Review

Best Exercises to Lower Blood Sugar

Cabbage Lowers Your Risk for Diabetes

Alcohol and Diabetes -Do They Mix?

Break Through Your Diet Plateau

How Many Calories Do I Burn

Quinoa-The New Superfood?

Break Through Your Diet Plateau
Magnesium-The Forgotten Essential Mineral

How Many Calories Do I Burn?

Ideal Breakfast for Hypoglycemia


DIETS AND FITNESS

BOWEL MOVEMENTS

INTESTINES-KEEP THEM
HEALTHY

QUINOA-THE NEW
SUPERFOOD

HOW MUCH IS TOO MUCH
SALT

HOW MUCH SALT IS IN MY
FOOD

SALT CONTENT OF COMMON
FOODS

150,000 DIE FROM EXCESS
SALT

I HAVE HIGH BLOOD
PRESSURE!

FOODS THAT LOWER YOUR
BLOOD PRESSURE

INFLAMMATION INSIDE
THE BODY

FAT--IT'S ALIVE!

WHY WE GO SOFT IN THE
MIDDLE

WHY EUROPEANS ARE
THINNER

>VEGETARIAN RECIPES


MY HEART ATTACK

CANCER SURVIVORS
BRAIN HEALTH

>CROSSWORD
PUZZLES
>LEARNING
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Mediterranean diet lowers risk of Type 2 diabetes
Following a Mediterranean diet that emphasizes greens and fish can help control
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