Top 10 Most Unusual Good Remedies
for
Sinusitis

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August 19, 2017

By Ariadne Weinberg, Featured Columnist



The dry statistics of health reports don't often yield blockbuster
surprises but recently I had a shock.  Do you know what is the
most common chronic health condition in the US?  According to
the Centers for Disease Control, it's sinusitis, that irritation in the
nose, where you’re not sure if you have allergies, a bad cold, or
something else entirely. For those who have chronic sinusitis,
you all already know what’s up. However, sometimes sinusitis
can be mysterious. And not the easiest thing to treat.
 
Many people automatically take antibiotics for temporary relief.
However, sinusitis bacteria are surprisingly tough and can
develop resistance to antibiotics. In addition, only 1/3rd of
sinusitis infections are caused by bacteria. Yours could be
completely different.
 
So what happens when you experience sinusitis exactly? The
tissues from the sinuses are becoming irritated and inflamed.
And as mentioned, the cause isn’t only bacterial: Fungal and viral
sinusitis also occurs.
 
You will most commonly go through cold symptoms, such as a
fever, headache, being stuffed up, and a runny nose. You may
also feel pressure and soreness.
 
If your diagnosis for sinusitis is positive, consider the array of
options you have. Don’t just automatically go with antibiotics or
standard nasal spray. Here are the 10 most unusual, safe
sinusitis cures that researchers are exploring at the moment.





























 
1.
Baby Shampoo
      
This is the last thing I would expect to put in my nasal cavities to
get some good results. However, baby shampoo seems to have
the active ingredient to kill off a sinus infection.

Come to think of it, I did used to get quite a lot of baby
shampoo in my eyes and nose back when Mom was doing the
shampooing for me, and I rarely had sinus problems.

The biofilms and oily layers are broken down by baby shampoo’s
active ingredient, bromelain.

According to Robert Graham, MD, MPH, an internist at Lenox Hill
Hospital in New York City and assistant professor at the Hofstra
North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine, “Bacteria have learned to
adapt to common sinus infection irrigation treatments such as
neti pot irrigating. Bromelain appears to be beneficial and helps
reduce swelling in the nasal passages.”
 
2.
Probiotics

If you take antibiotics, you run the risk of killing both good and
bad bacteria. The problem is that eliminating the good bacteria
means that there is nothing in the nasal cavity to help protect
against the buildup of bad bacteria.

Kr. Mas Takashima, director of the Sinus Center at Baylor,
confirms, “I haven’t been able to shake this sinus infection and
multiple courses of antibiotics and steroids aren’t helping. This
tells me that something must have occurred to cause a change in
the patient’s natural ability to fight off sinus infections. Current
research in my field suggests this may be caused by the
disruption of the natural bacterial habitat of the sinuses by the
antibiotics, which is why more doctors are utilizing probiotics.”
 
3.
Horseradish
 
Spicy foods have a great reputation for clearing out sinuses.
Horseradish is one of the stronger, weirder ones.

A 2006 study confirms that a horseradish-based medicine seems
to be especially effective. K.H. Goos from the Repha GMBH in
Biologische Arzneimittel in Langenhagen, Germany looked at
prospective cohort studies. 251 centers in Germany with
patients of 4 years or above with acute sinusitis between March
2004 and July 2005 were analyzed.

They were treated with either a mix of nasturtium herb and
horseradish root, horseradish root alone, or with standard
antibiotic therapy. The most effective cure against sinusitis
turned out to be the mix of nasturtium and horseradish.
 
4.
Avoid Certain foods --Sugar and Flour Especially
 
There are certain foods to avoid when you are developing
sinusitis or have chronic sinusitis.

Dr. Axe, Nashville-based clinical nutritionist, recommends some
to avoid as a general rule when sinusitis hits: sugar, fruit juices,
dairy, flour, grains, and excess salt. These are good starting out
points, but definitely go to a nutritionist and consult your
specific case, especially if you have chronic sinusitis.
 
5.
Ginger (and Ayurvedic Medicine)

Since many sinusitis cases are quite directly related to immune
issues as well, ginger is a great option. A combination of ginger
and steam inhalation seems to be particularly effective.

In 2006, H.K. Panigrahi and researchers from the Tibbia College
and Hospital in New Delhi India, performed an ayurvedic
medicine technique. They used 250 milligrams of ginger juice,
using a steam inhalation followed by intranasal instillation. If
you want to try ginger at home, you can simply make an infusion
or put the remedy in a tea. However, if you practice ayurvedic or
natural medicine, do ask your doctor for a specific technique for
treating sinusitis.
 
6.
Pineapple Stem Extract

Pineapples, like baby shampoo, are rich in bromelain.

In 2005, Josef Beuth and colleagues from the University of
Leipzig in Germany analyzed the therapeutic efficiency of the
proteolytic enzyme bromelain (obtained from a pineapple) on
kids 11 and under with acute sinusitis. Data was collected from
116 patients from 19 centres located across Germany.

Bromelain Pos, Bromelain Pos, with standard therapies, and
standard therapies alone, were all analyzed. The most effective
measure turned out to be Bromelain Pos alone.
 
7.
A Marine Cure

Sometimes, when you are looking for a solution for something,
you find a cure for something else. This was certainly the case
with Grant Burgess and researchers from Newcastle University in
2013. They were originally researching a certain microbe for the
purpose of cleaning hulls of ships. Instead, they found that
same microbe, bacillus licheniformis, was effective as a nasal
spray for chronic sinusitis. Many times, the problem with
sinusitis cures is that the bacteria form a biofilm, a shiny
protective barrier that makes them spray or antibiotic resistant.
Burgess’s in-vitro study showed that the marine enzyme
dispersed 58% of biofilms.
 
8.
Stop Taking Antibiotics as the Only Cure

Lots of doctors look at a sinusitis case and automatically write
their patients a prescription for antibiotics. However, recent
research shows that could be problematic.

Only about 1/3rd of sinus infections are caused by bacteria. And
unnecessary antibiotic use is one of the leading contributors to
antibiotic resistant infections, according to a 2017 report from
University of Georgia researcher Mark Ebell. He’s trying to
develop better clinical decision rules for diagnosing a sinus
infection. "That's one of the issues we wanted to call attention
to," he said. "This is a test that's widely used by doctors in
Europe, the U.K. and Australia, and has been shown to decrease
inappropriate antibiotic use."
 
9.
Use Anti-fungal Medicine for Chronic Sinusitis  
 
David A. Sherris, chair of medicine at the University of Buffalo,
and his colleagues, discovered that chronic sinusitis is an
immune disorder caused by fungus.

The solution? An antifungal medicine called amphotericin-B. In a
randomized double-blind pilot trial, they saw that the antifungal
agent caused a significant decrease in the inflammatory
thickening of sinus membranes.  

"We showed in 1999 that fungal organisms were present in the
mucus of 96 percent of patients who had surgery for chronic
sinusitis, and that inflammatory cells were clumped around the
fungi, which indicated to us that the condition was an immune
disorder caused by fungus, " said Sherris. "But many doctors
didn't believe us."
 
10.
Colloidal Silver, Really?
 
Silver is nothing I would think to put in my body to cure
anything. However, modern medicine never ceases to surprise
us.

Colloidal silver is a medicine consisting of silver particles
suspended in water.

In a 2014 study, R. Goggin and researchers from the University
of Adelaide found that after using the solution as a nasal spray,
symptoms of staphylococcus-aureus infected chronic
rhinosinusitis were shown to have improved markedly. You can
take colloidal silver in drops diluted in water or as nasal drops.
Ask your doctor for details on dosage and usage.







































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