Top 10 Health Dangers of High
Fructose Corn Syrup
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September 2, 2010, last updated April 4, 2013

By Louise Carr, Contributing Columnist


High fructose corn syrup is everywhere in our food supply. It's
one of the most common sweeteners in America. It's in corn
chips, sodas, ketchups and other condiments, breads, even
meats. And, perhaps not coincidentally, as the levels of high
fructose corn syrup have risen, so too have rates of obesity,
diabetes and metabolic syndrome.  What are the health dangers
of high fructose corn syrup? Just what are we doing to our
bodies when we pull open that can of soda? When we pour
sugary pre-packaged sauces over our food or reach for the
candy? What exactly is the real danger and where is it lurking
in the ingredients list?

Supersize Me with Fructose

America has a huge sweet tooth.  We are a sugar-laden nation.
And what’s the most convenient sugar-fix, one that we’re
increasingly reaching for? Soft drinks - no longer luxury items
for the table at Christmas and Thanksgiving. They’re
everywhere, and they’re full of fructose.

Fructose, particularly in soft drinks, consumption has risen
dramatically since the 70s. And according to abundant recent
research, during this time we’ve also got much fatter. The
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that in 1970
around 15 percent of the U.S. population met the definition for
obesity. Today nearly 1/3 of American adults are obese. Some
scientists say we are consuming more calories and sugar in
general and that is causing the problems. But others blame a
specific culprit: high fructose corn syrup.

What is High Fructose Corn Syrup?

High fructose corn syrup is a sweetener and preservative made
by changing the glucose in cornstarch into fructose, another
form of sugar. The result is a super-sweet mixture of glucose
and fructose. High fructose corn syrup is used in soft drinks
and sodas instead of glucose.

It may surprise you to learn that common table sugar, called
sucrose, actually contains fructose. Table sugar is made up of
50% fructose and 50% glucose.  What makes high fructose
corn  syrup "high fructose", is that it contains 55% fructose,
about 5% more than common table sugar.  Up until the 1960's,
common table sugar was the most common sweetener used in
products sold in America, according to a 2008 study jointly
conducted by the University of Central Florida, the University of
Rhode Island and the Rippe Lifestyle Institute led by Dr.
Kathleen Melanson.

There are actually two kinds of high fructose corn syrup used
today. One is used in sodas and beverages and is called HFCS-
55.  HFCS-55, as the name suggests is made up of 55%
fructose and 42% glucose.  The second kind of high fructose
corn syrup, used in baked goods and sweet confection
products,  is called HFCS-42, and is made up of 42% fructose
and 53% glucose.
Where Is High Fructose Corn Syrup Used?

As we've seen, high fructose corn syrup is used in soft drinks.
And it’s not just soft drinks. High fructose corn syrup also
sweetens the taste of breads, cereals, yogurts, soups,
processed foods, sauces and condiments. In fact, the majority
of cans and packets you find on your store cupboard shelves
are made with high fructose corn syrup.

High fructose corn syrup is popular with manufacturers
because it is cheap. As a sugar, it is sweeter than glucose and it
is easier to blend into drinks. According to statistics published
in 2004 research by Louisiana State University and the
University of North Carolina, high fructose corn syrup
represented 40 percent of caloric sweeteners added to foods
and beverages.

High fructose corn syrup is now the sole sweetener used in
best-selling soft drinks in the United States

How Much Are We Eating?

According to Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy
estimates, the average American eats around 12 teaspoons of
high fructose corn syrup every day. Teenagers, who are known
for drinking more soda, are perhaps even eating 80 percent
more than this. High fructose corn syrup has been on the
market since the early 70s. Since then, the consumption of high
fructose corn syrup in America has increased by over 1,000
percent according to an article in the April 2004 issue of the
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Is our high consumption
of high fructose corn syrup storing up a whole heap of
problems for our health?

Top 10 Health Dangers of High Fructose Corn Syrup





























1. High Fructose Corn Syrup Linked to Diabetes
Many scientists have pointed at high fructose corn syrup as a
culprit behind the spike in rates of diabetes. Diabetes is a
serious health problem in the U.S. and its rise has mirrored our
taste for high fructose corn syrup sweetened drinks and food.

According to the University of Florida College of Medicine,
fructose is the most dangerous of the sugars we eat. Why? Too
much fructose causes uric acid levels to spike. This can block
the ability of insulin to regulate how body cells use and store
sugar, leading to obesity, metabolic syndrome and type 2
diabetes.

A 2007 study from the Rutgers University in New Brunswick
linked drinks containing high fructose corn syrup to the
development of diabetes, particularly in children. The
laboratory study showed that high fructose corn syrup-
sweetened drinks had high levels of compounds called reactive
carbonyls.

Reactive carbonyls have the potential to trigger cell and tissue
damage that can cause diabetes or make diabetes worse.
Reactive carbonyls are not found in table sugar, where fructose
and glucose components are chemically stable. The researchers
are looking at ways in which tea components added to soft
drinks can limit the levels of reactive carbonyls.

2.
High Fructose Corn Syrup Is Especially Good At Fattening
You Up

Want to gain weight? High fructose corn syrup is especially
good at helping up put on the pounds. Even better than table
sugar.

Soft drinks and processed foods made with high fructose corn
syrup and other sugars are high in calories and low in
nutritional value. Simply put, if you consume a lot of them you
will gain weight. However, recent studies have shown that high
fructose corn syrup causes significantly greater weight gain
than regular table sugar.

Why is high fructose corn syrup so bad for your waistline?

A 2010 study from Princeton University found rats with access
to high fructose corn syrup gained more weight than those
with access to table sugar, although their calorie intake
remained the same.

“Some people have claimed that high-fructose corn syrup is no
different than other sweeteners when it comes to weight gain
and obesity, but our results make it clear that this just isn't
true, at least under the conditions of our tests,” said professor
Bart Hoebel of Princeton University. “When rats are drinking
high fructose corn syrup at levels well below those in soda pop,
they’re becoming obese - every single one, across the board.
Even when rats are fed a high-fat diet, you don't see this; they
don't all gain extra weight.”

That’s not all. In addition to weight gain, the rats put on a lot
of body fat, particularly around the abdomen, and blood fats
called triglycerides increased. Male rats in particular got
significantly bigger. A 2010 study from The Endocrine Society
found that when fructose is present as children's fat cells
mature, it results in more of these cells maturing into fat cells
found in belly fat.

Belly fat cells are less able to respond to insulin. Abdominal
obesity is linked with a raised risk of heart disease and Type 2
diabetes. Read more here about the
importance of your waist
size in predicting your risk for disease and even death.

3.
High Fructose Corn Syrup Raises Your High Blood Pressure

Continue reading  page 1  page 2

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Diabetics/ Foods That Lower Your Blood Sugar/ Diet Sodas -
Bad for Your Health? /

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