Thyme Is on Your Side  --- Top 7
Health Benefits of Thyme
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January 9, 2015

By Ariadne Weinberg, Contributing Columnist







Thyme. You know, that thing that goes with parsley and
sage, and was always an ingredient boiling in
your mother's chicken soup. Thyme is one of those
background herbs that combines with a lot. But it
has been a powerful force throughout history.


The word "thyme" has a few possible origins. It may come
from the Greek “to fumigate”, perhaps due to
its use as incense. Another theory is that it comes from the
word "thumus", meaning courage. This has a
logical explanation. Greeks and Romans burned thyme to
purify temples and homes. And Roman soldiers exchanged
thyme as a sign of respect and a symbol of courage and
bravery in battle.

But thyme dates back to even farther than that. In ancient
Egypt, they used it to embalm their dead. One of the first
medicinal uses of thyme was when the Romans ate it before
or after a meal to protect
against poisoning.

In the 1340s, thyme was thought to be a cure against the
black death. Although there was not much science behind
this, it probably helped some. Thyme's essential oil, thymol,
has antiseptic properties that likely eased the symptoms. In
the Victorian age, people infused bandages with thyme
and water (another kind of antiseptic) to doctor the wounds.

And today, thyme is still on your side. That silent herb,
huddled between plants in your garden, or
boiling on your kitchen stove, provides many a modern
remedy.

Here, now, are 7 health conditions which thyme helps to
remedy:





























1.
Vaginal Infections

Well, ladies. It looks like using products with thyme could
help the common yeast and other
vaginal infections.

In December 2010, a study carried out by Perrin Bahadoran
for the Iranian Journal of Nursing and Midwifery Research,
tested two different creams as a relief for mycotic vaginitis:
Clotrimazole cream and a cream containing garlic and thyme.
The cream containing garlic and thyme
proved equally as effective as the more traditional
Clotrimazole cream.

However, you can also use home remedies. Vaginal
infections, especially yeast infections, are often caused by an
imbalance in PH. The vagina should be more acidic and less
alkaline. Drinking a thyme infusion made with boiling water
could help ease symptoms.

2.
Bacterial Infections

Thyme is an expert at fighting against bacteria. In a 2015
study conducted by Sienkiewicz from the Medical and
Sanitary Microbiology Department at the Medical University
of Lodz, they tested the antimicrobial activity of thyme
essential oil against multidrug resistant clinical bacterial
strains.

It turned out that thyme battled the bacteria well, strongly
inhibiting the growth of the clinical strains
tested. It looks as if thyme has the potential to be the new
popular drug in many pharmaceuticals that
treat infections.

3.
Acne

We (well at least many of us, the author here included) all
remember staring intently at the mirror,
wondering whether we could just make our acne disappear
with the force of our mind. Because none of
the treatments we used seemed to completely kill it. It
probably never occurred to us to use thyme.  Further
research is still needed, but thyme, with its antibacterial and
anti-inflammatory properties,
seems to be excellent for skin.

In a 2012 study at Leeds Metropolitan University directed by
Dr. Margarita Gomez-Escalada, they tested thyme, marigold,
and myrrh tinctures on acne bacteria. The tincture was
prepared by steeping the plant material in alcohol for days to
weeks.

What the scientists discovered was that all
three spices were able to kill the bacteria in 5 minutes, but
that thyme was the most effective.

They also found out that thyme had a greater antibacterial
effect than benzoyl peroxide, the active ingredient in all those
face washes and scrubs we've all been desperately using.

Hopefully, if further tests prove successful, this
generation's batch of teenagers can save their pharmacy
money and go out to the garden to whip up a
tincture.  

4.  
Boost Your Immune System

There's a good reason thyme was an ingredient in your
mother's chicken soup. It is full of nutrients, so
it will prevent you from getting sick and help you feel better
if you've already got that cold.

Thyme is rich in Vitamin C, the primary ingredient needed to
boost your immune system. But thyme also contains a lot of
other necessary nutrients, such as
vitamin A, as well as B
vitamins, potassium, iron, and manganese.

Vitamin A helps maintain healthy skin and good vision.
Vitamin B6 reduces stress. Potassium controls
heart rate and
blood pressure. And manganese is used by
the body to form red blood cells.

It would appear that you've just got to put a sprig of thyme
in your morning coffee and everything will be all
right.

5.
Lower Your Blood Pressure

As I mentioned, thyme contains potassium, the ingredient
which helps control your heart rate and blood
pressure. This might explain the link with lower blood
pressure. A study was conducted in 2014 on one
species of thyme, Thymus linearis Benth, typically found in
Afghanistan and Pakistan.

Almageer and other researchers found that when this variety
of thyme extract was tested on rats, it lowered
hypertension (also known as high blood pressure) as well as
cholesterol.

It is possible, therefore, that thyme contains an active anti-
hypertensive ingredient. In any case, you may as well put
some on your dinner, since it's delicious.

6.
Cure Your Cough

Whenenever I had a bad cough as a kid, my mom used to
boil water and infuse it with herbs. One of those herbs was
thyme. Thyme is helpful for the common cough, and it seems
to be effective in treating bronchitis.

A 2015 study from the University of Medical Sciences in
Poznan, Poland led by Dr. E. Witkowska-Banaszczak found
that thyme and thymol, the ingredients in Bronchosol, a
typical kind of cough syrup, were antimicrobial. In other
words, thyme eliminated microorganisms that cause
infections of the respiratory tract.

Another 2006 study lead by Kemmerich from the Practice for
Internal Medicine and Pneumology in Munich,
Germany, found that a fluid extract combination of thyme
and ivy leaves significantly reduced symptoms of acute
bronchitis, including coughing. So whether it is an infusion,
cough syrup, or extract,when you have your next bad cold,
try including thyme as one of your treatments.

7.
Cheer Up

Not only can thyme cure what ails you, it can boost your
mood. It has an active ingredient called
"carvacrol".

In 2013, Margherita Zotti and researchers from the
Department of Clinical and Experimental
Medicine at the University of Foggia in Italy performed a
study where they administered a moderate
dosage of carvacrol to rats over a seven-day time period.

This increased dopamine and seratonin levels
in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Happier rats.

Thyme is also human-safe and smells delicious, making it a
great option to lift your spirits by inhaling it as an essential
oil or using it directly as an herb in your lunch.



































Related:
Tinnitus -Symptoms and Remedies /Meniere's
Disease-Ideal Diet /Foods That Reduce Blood Pressure
/
Sugar-the Disease Connection /Foods That Shrink Your
Waist / Ideal Weight for Women / Swollen Ankles -Causes
and Cures /Tight Bras and Briefs-Health Dangers /Are Diet
Sodas Bad for Your Health?
Bowel Color-What It Means/ Urine Color-What It Means


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Thyme tea helps to lower your blood
pressure and break up congestion.