DIET AND FITNESS:

The Camel Effect --- How Salt
Helps You Lose Weight

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May 6, 2018


By Susan Callahan, Associate Editor and Featured Columnist


We in America have a love-hate relationship with salt. We
love how it makes food taste. And we hate the effects it has
on our blood pressure and health in general. The medical
community, on the other hand, is not at all conflicted on their
view of salt. To paraphrase Gordon Gekko's  dry summary of
greed in the movie Wall Street that "greed is good", the
medical community's view on salt is equally simple --- salt is
bad.

Or is it? We know that salt elevates blood pressure but are
all of its effects bad fro our health. A recent study on salt's
effects on lab animals has raised questions about salt's bad
reputation.

Salt Helps You Lose Weight?

New studies on Russian cosmonauts in isolation designed to
simulate outer space and n lab mice have shown a
heretofore unknown relationship between salt and weight
loss. Salt previously was believed to make us thirstier.

Taken together, these studies showed that high consumption
of salt does not necessarily make us thirstier. It makes us
hungrier. But perhaps what is more striking is that our
bodies appear to burn 25% more calories on a high salt diet.

In the study on lab mice, published on April 17, 2018 in the
Journal on Clinical Investigation,  a group of scientists
explored the relationship between salt intake, water
retention and the amount of calories burned. The mice study
was a follow up to a study by these scientists on 10 healthy
people in which they learned that increasing the amount of
salt eaten actually decreases the amount of water a person
drinks.

The mice study showed the same surprising pattern; Mice
fed a high salt diet drank less water and burned 25 more
calories.

The Camel Effect -Your Body Produces Its Own Water When
You Eat too Much Salt



All land animals need water and air to live. When a camel
crosses the desert without water to drink, how does its body
stay alive? It does so by breaking down the fat in its hump.
This process of breaking down the fat releases water which
is used by the camel's body when it can't drink water.

It turns out that we humans also have a camel's fat hump.
Excess fat on our bodies is also broken down whenever we
have taken in too much salt and too little outside water.

So, can you just take a ox of table salt with you and forget
the water when you next cross a desert? I don't think so.
The mechanism and calibration of the water produced from
fat breakdown is not yet precisiely understood. Better pack
your canteen of water.

Our Bodies Burn 25% More Calories when We have too
Much Salt





























Up front, let's state the obvious and well-proven. Taking in
too much
salt destroys your blood pressure and arteries and
can kill you. Current guidelines from the American Heart
Association recommend no more than 1500 mg f  salt fr
those who need to control salt intake. That's about half a
teaspoon.

But, when your body is starved of water and has too much
salt, it break down fat to release water. It performs this
magic trick by releasing steroids called "glucocortoids". As
the scientists in the 2017 study noted, "salt can induce a
glucocorticoid-driven catabolic state with increased urea
osmolyte and metabolic water generation. ".

You may know glucocortoids from medications you take for
rheumatoid arthritis. Taking these medications can weaken
your bones and cause osteoporosis.

The Glucosteroid Effect of Salt May Not Produce Long-term
Weight Loss


In humans and with all animals, excess salt induces
production of glucocortids that produce weight loss and
other adverse effects, including "acute effects to raise blood
pressure, induce insulin resistance, increase protein
catabolism and elevate plasma glucose." This was an
observation from a 2008 study by the Centre for
Cardiovascular Science at the University of Edinburgh.

There is more bad news. In humans, the weight loss effects
are not long-term, a fact that has puzzled scientists.

Moreover, the Ednburgh study observed that, in people who
naturally produce glucocortoids, those with Cushing's
disease, they do exhibit both reductions in fat on their arms
and legs and deposits of fat in their middle, giving them a
"lemon on sticks" appearance.









































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I HAVE HIGH BLOOD
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FOODS THAT LOWER YOUR
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QUINOA-THE NEW
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INFLAMMATION INSIDE
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