Spotting During Pregnancy --Causes
and Top 10 Remedies

July 11, 2011, last updated July 8, 2014

By Louise Carr, Associate Editor and Featured Columnist
Related Links:
Pregnancy -What to Eat
Ideal Blood Sugar Levels During Pregnancy
Ideal Breakfast for Heart Health
Does Drinking Coffee Affect Diabetes =A Comprehensive Review
Why Americans Read In Bathrooms-The Hidden Epidemic of Constipation
Bowels -3 Keys to Normal Bowels
Break Through Your Diet Plateau
How Many Calories Do I Burn
Fiber Rich Foods
Quinoa-The New Superfood?
Fish Oil Benefits-Let Me Count the Ways
Normal Fasting Blood Sugar
My Heart Attack-personal stories from survivors
Fat-It's Alive!
Foods That Reduce Your Blood Pressure
Ideal Breakfast for Losing Weight
Waist Size Matters
Six Pack Abs Step by Step
Americans Are Dangerously Sleep Deprived
Ideal Breakfast for Hypoglycemia

[Health and fitness articles are reviewed by our team of
Doctors and Registered Nurses as well as other members of
our Editorial Board.]




Becoming a mother is as terrifying as it is exhilarating. It’s only
natural to worry when you’re pregnant, particularly about any
kind of bleeding you experience. But try to keep calm. If you
suffer from spotting or bleeding in early pregnancy it doesn’t
necessarily mean your pregnancy is at risk. What causes
spotting or bleeding when you’re pregnant, and how do you
know if it means something serious? What should you do if you
bleed when you’re pregnant?

What Is Spotting During Pregnancy?

Spotting during pregnancy is light bleeding from your vagina.
The spotting is like a period but most often lighter. The color of
the blood can vary from bright red to dark brown.

How Many Women Suffer From Spotting During Pregnancy?

Spotting during pregnancy, despite your fears, is a common
occurrence. Around one quarter of mums-to-be have some
spotting in early pregnancy. According to the Women's Health
Care Concentration, California State University (2009), vaginal
bleeding and spotting affects 15 percent to 25 percent of
women in early pregnancy.

The good news is most spotting episodes don’t last long.
According to a 2010 study from the National Institute of
Environmental Health Sciences in North Carolina, most first
trimester bleeding episodes last less than three days and most
occur between weeks 5 and 8. Of the 4,539 pregnant women
enrolled in the study, 1,207 of them reported a total of 1,656
episodes of bleeding. Of these episodes, only 8% involved
heavy bleeding and only 28% of the total episodes of bleeding
also involved pain.

Does Spotting Always Mean Miscarriage?

While your first instinct is to panic if you see blood in your
underwear, spotting does not always mean miscarriage. Many
women who are bleeding in early pregnancy go on to have
successful births.

In the results of the 2010 study from the National Institute of
Environmental Health Sciences, North Carolina, 12 percent of
the women who reported bleeding -- and 13 percent of the
women who didn’t --- experienced miscarriage. Other studies
report that around half of women who report bleeding
experience a miscarriage.

However, the risk does depend, to a large extent, on the
heaviness of the bleeding. Light spotting in the first trimester of
pregnancy, especially if it lasts only one to two days, is not
normally associated with an increased risk of miscarriage
according to a 2009 study from the National Institute of
Environmental Health Sciences, North Carolina. This study
looked at 4,510 women, out of whom 1,204 reported bleeding
(both light and heavy).

On the other hand, women with heavy bleeding were three
times more likely to experience miscarriage than women
without bleeding. Miscarriage is more likely to be the cause of
your bleeding if you suffer heavy bleeding with cramps and
pain in your stomach, pelvis and back. Miscarriage can start
with a little spotting but bleeding associated with a miscarriage
usually gets heavier while light spotting often goes away on its
own.

What Is Light And Heavy Bleeding?




























Sometimes it can be difficult to know whether your bleeding
should be considered light or heavy. Compared with your
period, light bleeding produces less blood and the color may be
light brown or light red. Heavy bleeding causes significant
discomfort and often pain. You may also feel lightheaded and
dizzy.

Spotting in the First Trimester

When spotting occurs, it most often happens during the first
trimester.

Spotting, when it does occur, is unlikely to be heavy. According
to the results of an important  2010 study from the National
Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, North Carolina
around 25% of the 4,539 women surveyed reported bleeding
in the first trimester but out of this number just 8 percent
reported heavy bleeding.

Of those women who experienced light bleeding in the first
trimester, about a third (28%) experienced pain.

But of those women who experienced heavy bleeding, 54% of
them experienced pain.  So, overall, if you have heavy bleeding,
you are also likely to feel pain.

When Does Spotting Usually Occur

In the North Carolina study, of the women who experienced
bleeding, most of the bleeding episodes lasted only a few days,
usually 3 days.  The bleeding also happed usually between
week 5 and week 8 of your pregnancy

Does Spotting Mean You Will Have a Miscarriage

The good news is usually spotting does not mean a miscarriage
will follow. In the North Carolina study, only 12% of the
women who experienced light bleeding  had a miscarriage. And
only 13% of those who had heavy bleeding suffered a
miscarriage.

We’ve looked at the scientific evidence to come up with a list of
the most common causes of spotting during pregnancy. It’s
important to keep calm and remember most cases of spotting
are harmless and “just one of those things”.

However, spotting during pregnancy can be the sign of
something serious so you should always get it checked out by
your health care professional. According to a 1999 study from
the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas,
second and third trimester bleeding is a likely sign of placental
abnormalities and needs prompt referral to a doctor.

What Are The Causes Of Spotting During Pregnancy?

1. Ectopic Pregnancy Can Cause Spotting

An ectopic pregnancy occurs when the fertilized egg doesn’t
implant in your uterus, as normal, but outside it – most
commonly in the fallopian tube. Ectopic pregnancy occurs in
around 1 in 100 pregnancies, according to the Ectopic
Pregnancy Foundation.

The bleeding associated with ectopic pregnancy tends to be
dark and watery, and a purplish or deep brown color. Other
symptoms include abdominal pain down one side, pain in the
tip of your shoulder, bowel pain and vomiting. Unfortunately
the baby cannot be saved if it starts to develop in the fallopian
tube, but the mother needs surgery to prevent serious
complications and possible death.

There’s not a lot you can do to prevent ectopic pregnancy such
as protecting yourself from pelvic inflammatory disease, which
increases your ectopic pregnancy risk.

Having yourself screened for chlamydia is one of the best
protections against pelvic inflammatory disease and
miscarriage. Chlamydia is the most common sexually
transmitted disease in the US, according to a 2010 study from
the University of London, Division of Community Health
Sciences, St. George's.

2.
Spotting May Be A Sign Of Miscarriage

While the statistics in the article above show that not every
incidence of spotting or bleeding results in miscarriage,
spotting can be a first sign. Some women have a miscarriage
before they even know they’re pregnant, by mistaking the
bleeding for their period. Miscarriage is the loss of the
pregnancy and it usually occurs in the first three months. Early
miscarriage happens when the baby fails to develop properly,
but no one really knows why many miscarriages occur. There is
another miscarriage event to consider, the threatened
miscarriage where you experience bleeding but your cervix
remains tightly closed. In this case, the pregnancy is likely to
continue successfully.

3.
IVF May Make Spotting More Likely

You are likely to experience spotting if you have conceived
through assisted reproductive technique, or similar IVF
treatments, according to a 2006 study from University Hospital
Gent, Belgium. When you have IVF, more than one embryo may
be put into your womb but one or more may not continue to
develop. When this happens it’s called a “vanishing twin” and it
can cause bleeding. The study showed a correlation between
the incidence of bleeding in the first trimester and the number
of embryos transferred.

4.
Your Hormones Can Trigger Spotting And Bleeding




Continue reading         page 1        page 2



Related:
Pregnancy -What to Eat

Ideal Blood Sugar Levels During Pregnancy

Ideal Breakfast for Heart Health


DIETS AND FITNESS


BOWEL MOVEMENTS

INTESTINES-KEEP THEM
HEALTHY

QUINOA-THE NEW
SUPERFOOD

HOW MUCH IS TOO MUCH
SALT

HOW MUCH SALT IS IN MY
FOOD

SALT CONTENT OF COMMON
FOODS

150,000 DIE FROM EXCESS
SALT

I HAVE HIGH BLOOD
PRESSURE!

FOODS THAT LOWER YOUR
BLOOD PRESSURE

INFLAMMATION INSIDE THE
BODY

FAT--IT'S ALIVE!

WHY WE GO SOFT IN THE
MIDDLE

WHY EUROPEANS ARE
THINNER

>VEGETARIAN RECIPES


MY HEART ATTACK

CANCER SURVIVORS
BRAIN HEALTH

>CROSSWORD
PUZZLES
>LEARNING
>MEMORY LOSS


MONEY AND BUDGET

RESOURCES

AMERICAN HEART
ASSOCIATION

LINKS AND RESOURCES
COLLECTIVE
WIZDOM.COM

Healthy Body, Healthy Mind, Healthy Life



Home > Conditions >
Pregnancy > > You Are Here


About Us

Register

Privacy Policy

Editorial Policy

Meet Our Medical and Fitness Experts

Contact Us

Disclaimer : All information on www.collectivewizdom.com is for educational purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice. For
specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, please consult your doctor.  
(c) copyright collectivewizdom.com 2007 -2014 and all prior years. All rights reserved

Collectivewizdom,LLC is located at 340 S Lemon Ave #2707 Walnut, CA 91789
Subscribe in a reader
Custom Search