Continued from page 1

Septicemia --- Signs and Top 9 Risks

Related Links
Why Won't My Wound Heal?- Causes and Top 10 Natural Remedies

Why Do I Keep Getting Boils on My Vulva?- Causes and Cures

Muscles Help You Recover from Illness Faster

Exercise Center

Normal Waist Size

Muscle Cramps At Night

Exercise At Home to Lose Weight

Diet and Exercise -Simple Plan for Life
Onions Prevent Heart Disease
Olive Oil---Drink and Live onger
Stop Colic with These Natural Remedies










November 6, 2012

By Joey Carney, Contributing Columnist







6.       
Broken Bones?—Beware of Sepsis?  Septicemia is
particularly common with infections of the bone (osteomyelitis),
the central nervous system (meningitis), and the heart
(endocarditis), happening before or at the same time as these
infections. This usually happens after bone surgery, for example,
from a broken leg; from spinal injury or even a from a sinus
infection; or from injecting drugs, prior heart valve surgery, or a
previous heart condition. And of course, as we age, we have an
increased risk of broken bones --- especially hip fractures --- from
osteoporosis. (Read more about tips to help you prevent hip
fractures.)

The common remedies for sepsis related to broken bones inlcude
of course antibiotics and stopping the source of the original
infection. In the case of a bone infection, it may require surgery to
remove the infected bone. A 2012 study by researchers from
Jagiellonian University Medical College revealed that endocarditis
inflammation can go as far as leading to brain damage and
proposed that this type of infection was the main cause of death in
severe sepsis.

7.       
Kidney Problems Can Lead to Sepsis. Septicemia is often
caused by kidney damage and its associated dialysis treatment.
According to the international Society of Nephrology, Septicemia
occurs frequently with patients on peritoneal dialysis and
hemodialysis. Although dialysis is frequently a last resort
treatment of Septicemia, it can also be the cause. Other than new
kidneys, treatment usually involves antibiotics, blood pressure
medicine, or surgery to remove the infected area. However, as
above, the best thing you can do is have an early referral to a
nephrologist, improve your nutrition, and be aware of the signs of
septicemia.

8.       
Miscarriage Can Increase Your Risk for Septicemia.  





























Having a miscarriage at home, even from a very early pregnancy,
can literally put your life at risk. The worst thing you can do is to
do nothing and not see a doctor.

A partial miscarriage, or missed miscarriage, can result in
septicemia. This is particularly dangerous if pregnancy remains
stay in the uterus and become infected. In short, there are a
multitude of reasons that can cause septicemia. Septicemia does
not develop by itself, but grows when bacteria is present in other
parts of the body, almost always from a previous condition or
from surgical complications.

In addition to seeing your doctor to seek immediate medical help,
there are some natural remedies that  can support your healing. A
2007 article by the University of Arizona College of Medicine states
that while homeopathic, herbal, and nutritional cures are generally
not effective as treatment, they found that natural agents such as
vitamins help prevent long term risk and that even homeopathy
may play an important role in preventing sepsis. Staying healthy,
clean, and eating well are your best bet. (Read more about
miscarriage causes and prevention tips.)

9.
Obesity Increases Your Risk of Sepsis When You Deliver a Baby.

When it comes to sepsis associated with delivery of your baby,
obesity is a major risk factor. A 2012 study from a team of doctors
from the University of Oxford and the University of Aberdeen
found that obese women have twice the risk of sepsis from
delivery as women of normal weight.

Sepsis is the leading cause of death during delivery of babies in
the UK, and accounts for between 10% and 64% of all pregnancy-
related admissions to intensive care units in Europe and the U.S.
according to the same 2012 University of Oxford study.  In the
Netherlands alone, sepsis accounted for 7.7% of pregnancy-
related deaths in the 13-year period from 1993 to 2006, according
to a 2009 study from the Medical Centre Haaglanden in the Hague,
The Netherlands.

Because obesity increases your risk for sepsis, you should try to
get in the best physical shape possible before you try to get
pregnant.  (Read more about
exercises you can do at home to lose
weight.)


Back to
page 1




Find out more tips to improve  your skin and general health:

Why Won't My Wound Heal? - Causes and Top 10 Natural
Remedies

Why Do I Keep Getting Boils on My Vulva?- Causes and Cures

Exercise To Increase Muscle Mass and Boost Metabolism

Exercise Center

Why Your Hand Grip Foretells How Long You'll Live  Bowel
Movements Indicate Your
Overall Health  /Ideal Breakfast for
Losing Weight
/ Bowel Color-What It Means / Sugar - the Disease
Connection

Index of Articles on
This Site


Snoring Linked to
Stroke

How to Stop Bad Breath

BRAIN HEALTH



DIETS AND FITNESS

HOW MUCH IS TOO MUCH
SALT

HOW MUCH SALT IS IN MY
FOOD

SALT CONTENT OF COMMON
FOODS

150,000 DIE FROM EXCESS
SALT

I HAVE HIGH BLOOD
PRESSURE!

FOODS THAT LOWER YOUR
BLOOD PRESSURE

QUINOA-THE NEW
SUPERFOOD

INFLAMMATION INSIDE
THE BODY

FAT--IT'S ALIVE!

WHY WE GO SOFT IN THE
MIDDLE

WHY EUROPEANS ARE
THINNER

>VEGETARIAN RECIPES


MY HEART ATTACK

CANCER SURVIVORS


MONEY AND BUDGET

RESOURCES

AMERICAN HEART
ASSOCIATION

LINKS AND RESOURCES

Home  > Exercise > Muscle   
> You Are Here
Custom Search


About Us   

Register

Privacy Policy

Editorial Policy

Contact Us

Disclaimer : All information on www.collectivewizdom.com is for educational purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice. For
specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, please consult your doctor.  

(c) copyright collectivewizdom.com 2007 -2014 and all prior years. All rights reserved.
Collectivewizdom,LLC is located at 340 S Lemon Ave #2707 Walnut, CA 91789
Subscribe in a reader
Dental procedures, especially those
involving surgery, can introduce
bacteria into your blood stream  
which can lead to septicemia.
COLLECTIVE
WIZDOM.COM

Healthy Body, Healthy Mind, Healthy Life