DIET AND FITNESS:

Secrets of the Argentine Tango -- It
May Banish Parkinson's Disease
Related Links
Dancing Reduces Risk of Dementia By 76%

Why Are My Hands Shaking?-Causes and Top 10 Natural Remedies

Tango Is Medicine - Top 7 Health Benefits

Epilepsy-Top 10 Foods That Help

These Massage Techniques Reduce Tremors and Shaking

What Your Handwriting Says About Your Health

Meniere's Disease-An Ideal Diet

Foods That Lower Your Blood Pressure

Magnesium--The Forgotten Essential Mineral

Waist Size Matters

Bowel Movements Indicate Your Overall Health

March 28, 2011, last updated August 3, 2013
By A. J. Lee, Featured Columnist

[Health and fitness articles are reviewed by our team of
Doctors, Registered Nurses, Certified fitness trainers and other
members of our Editorial Board.]







In a dusky dance hall on a cobbled street of the San Telmo
barrio of  Buenos Aires, the dying sunlight backlights the
silhouettes of men and women slowly assembling on a creaky
dance floor.  The dancers, erstwhile accountants, taxi drivers
and newly-graduated but still unemployed university students,
move slowly toward each other as they prepare for the next
tango.  Fingers clasped, the man guides the woman into his
arms, a slight lean of the hips subtly initiating the intricate
patterns of poses and interplay of feet that are the hallmark of
the Argentine tango.  In the years when I lived in Argentina,
watching the superb tango dancers was the highlight of my
week. Now research has discovered that tango is not just
wonderful to do and to watch—it may also help to combat the
debilitating tremors of Parkinson’s disease.

Dr. Madeline Hackney and Dr. Gammon Earhart of the
Washington University School of Medicine carried out a study
to find out the effects of Argentine tango on those with
Parkinson’s disease. The study, completed in 2010, sought to
compare the benefits of Argentine tango on the disease versus
other ballroom dances such as the Fox Trot.

What they confirmed was that, when we dance to rhythmic
music, a small area of our brains called the basal ganglia
becomes much more active than usual.  This is significant
because researchers are increasingly coalescing around the
view that the tremors characteristic of Parkinson's disease
involve disruptions in the normal coordinating pathways of the
basal ganglia. As a 2008 study led by Dr. J.A. Obeso of the
University of Navarra in Spain ventured,"
The growing
understanding of the complexity of the normal BG [basal
ganglia] ... should guide the development of more efficacious
therapies for Parkinson's disease.
"

Why is dance different from say, walking or running? Patterns
are one of the reasons. Tango has strong predictable beats and
requires the dancers to sort out a pattern on the dance floor.  

Also, tango, unlike Fox Trot and other dances, involves
numerous sharp stops, changes of directions and changes in
movement speeds.

The researchers discovered that, in many ways, Tango is an
ideal dance for Parkinson’s patients, mimicking many of the
moves used in rehab physiotherapy for Parkinson’s.

Here are the elements of Tango that do the trick:



























1.        
Now Freeze! The sudden stops in Tango, especially,
challenge the dancer to concentrate on balance. The brain
becomes accustomed to sharp turns and sudden full stops,
movements that mimic the rehab physiotherapy prescribed for
Parkinson’s patients.

2.        
Speed Up.  One of the characteristics of Parkinson’s is
the slowing down of movement called “Bradykinesia”.  Tango  
requires dancers to move at many different speeds, slow
approaches to a pattern can switch suddenly into  a snap to a
rigid freeze, before launching again into speedy foot patterns.
The speeding up may activate fast which muscle fibers which
can deteriorate when any of us grows older and may
deteriorate even faster in Parkinson’s patients.

3.        
Patterns. Again, our brains like to sort out puzzles.  
Tango dance patterns are really giant puzzles on the floor, with
both partners trying to work out a satisfactory pattern while
maintaining balance and the appropriate speed.


How Much Tango Do You Have to Do to See Improvement?

The dancers showed improvement in tremor control after
dancing for one hour twice a week for thirteen weeks.  Both
the Tango and Fox Trot groups showed improvements in
walking gait speed, balance built the Tango dancers improved
much more.

This isn’t the first study that found that Tango helps you to age
well. A previous study in 2005 led by Dr. A.C. Jacobson and Dr.
P.A. McKinley and published by the Society of Neuroscience
discovered that geriatric patients who engaged in Argentine
Tango experienced greater improvements in walking speed and
balance than those who only walked for exercised.





[Meet the
Doctors and Nurses on our Medical Review team.]



Related:
Sing for Your Life -Top 7 Health Benefits of Singing

Dancing Reduces Risk of Dementia By 76%

Why Are My Hands Shaking?-Causes and Top 10 Remedies

Meniere's Disease-Natural Remedies

How Much Is Too Much Salt?

Ideal Breakfast for Diabetics


Normal Fasting Blood Sugar

Natural Insulin Foods That Help You Control Your Blood Sugar

Foods That Reduce Blood Pressure

Index of Articles on This
Site


Snoring Linked to Stroke

How to Stop Bad Breath

BRAIN HEALTH



DIETS AND FITNESS

HOW MUCH IS TOO MUCH
SALT

HOW MUCH SALT IS IN MY
FOOD

SALT CONTENT OF COMMON
FOODS

150,000 DIE FROM EXCESS
SALT

I HAVE HIGH BLOOD
PRESSURE!

FOODS THAT LOWER YOUR
BLOOD PRESSURE

QUINOA-THE NEW
SUPERFOOD

INFLAMMATION INSIDE THE
BODY

FAT--IT'S ALIVE!

WHY WE GO SOFT IN THE
MIDDLE

WHY EUROPEANS ARE
THINNER

>VEGETARIAN RECIPES


MY HEART ATTACK

CANCER SURVIVORS


MONEY AND BUDGET

RESOURCES

AMERICAN HEART
ASSOCIATION

LINKS AND RESOURCES

Home  > Conditions  >
Parkinson's > Here
COLLECTIVE WIZDOM.COM
Healthy Body, Healthy Mind, Healthy Life


About Us

Register

Privacy Policy

Editorial Policy

Meet Our Medical and Fitness Experts

Contact Us

Disclaimer : All information on www.collectivewizdom.com is for educational purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice. For
specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, please consult your doctor.  
(c) copyright collectivewizdom.com 2007 -201
7 and all prior years. All rights reserved

Collectivewizdom,LLC is located at 340 S Lemon Ave #2707 Walnut, CA 91789
Subscribe in a reader
Tango helps to steady the
shaking experienced with
Parkinson's.