Rhubarbs Are Not Just Old School
Anymore --- Top 7 Health Benefits
Related Links

Top 10 Herbs and Spices That Lower Blood Pressure

Thyme Is on Your Side - Top 7 Health Benefits of Thyme

7 Crazy Good Things You Don't Know About Pineapples

7 Crazy Good Things You Don't Know About Cinnamon

7 Crazy Good Things You Don't Know About Oregano

Why Won't My Wound Heal? -Causes and Top 10 Natural Remedies

Boils and Styes - Causes and Top 7 Natural Remedies

Use Thyme to Heal Boils on the Vulva

Ear Infection - Causes and Top 10 Natural Remedies

Purple Marks on Your Arms -Causes and Cures

Foods That Help You Reduce Stress

Why Do I Hear My Pulse in My Ear?

Why Am I Dizzy? -Top 10 Causes and Remedies

Supertasters-Who Ae They

Blood Pressure-What It Means

Burning Mouth Syndrome-Causes and Cures

Tongue Color-What It Means
Last updated October 20, 2016 (originally published February 14,
2016
)

By Ariadne Weinberg, Featured Columnist









When I was a kid, one of the best things my mother could
say to me was, “I’m making strawberry rhubarb pie.” It’s
just one of those desserts that makes life worth living. I
knew all about strawberries; they grew in our garden. But
the rhubarb was always somewhat of a mystery. It was
another thing mixed in with the strawberries. Honestly, I
didn’t see rhubarb in much else besides that magical pie.




Rhubarb isn’t just part of an old-school dessert that your
Mom might make, although I suppose you could argue that it
is “old-school”.  Rhubarb has been used as a
healing food
for almost 5,000 years, dating back to 2700 BC in China,
where it was used medicinally for its purgative properties.




These days, rhubarb is back on the scene, mixed with
dessert or raw, with even more health benefits under its
leaves (which, by the way, you don’t want to eat due to a
high content of oxalic acid; just eat the stems).  

Here are the Top 7 health benefits of rhubarbs we've found,
based on scientific research from around the world:





































1.
Calms Your Stomach

Rhubarb was first used for purgative properties, which is a
fancy way to say that it cures
constipation.

Today, rhubarb is still used for various gastro-intestinal
issues.

A 2001 study from the journal of Ethnopharmacology
revealed that the tannin extract in rhubarb has an anti-
diarrheic effect. Conveniently enough, this depended on the
dose. The same active ingredient could both be a laxative or
stop diarrhea.

Rhubarb can even help those with gastrointestinal cancer
recover after the operation. In 2006, Dr. Q. Huang and
researchers at the National University of Singapore found
that rhubarb helps to accelerate recovery after surgery.  

They gave patients in the study rhubarb one day before the
operation, and two days after the operation. The results
were positive --- patients experienced
"anti-inflammatory
effects
" as well as laxative properties and intestine health.

By anti-inflammatory effects, they mean that rhubarbs help
reduce swelling around the surgical wounds. They also mean
that the amount of
internal inflammation, in arteries and
throughout the body, is reduced by rhubarb.  




2.
Reduces Your Risk of Cancer   

In the same study at the University of Singapore, scientists
discovered rhubarb's amazing potential to not only alleviate
discomfort in cancer patients, but actually to reduce the risk
of cancer itself.

They studied the rhubarb species "rheum palmatrum" and its
properties. What they discovered is that "anthraquinones"
(molecules composed of hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon)
from the rhubarb plant contribute to the
reduction of cancer.

One anthraquinon, "emodin", was able to inhibit cellular
proliferation and prevent metastasis. Another antraquinon
called "rein" could block the uptake of glucose in tumor cells
and lead to cell death.

Mix rhubarb into your favorite dessert, and if anyone
bothers you about eating too much sugar, tell them, “It’s
okay. I’m preventing cancer.”



3.
Improves Circulation and Boost Metabolism   

Do you get cold often? Do your feet or hands fall asleep? Of
course, getting exercise is the main go-to short-term
solution, but eating rhubarb could help in the long-term.

In a 2004 study from Bahauddin Akariya University, Dr. T.M.
Ansari and colleagues analyzed essential trace metals in
plants, including zinc, manganese, copper, and iron.

It turns out that rhubarb contains trace amounts of copper
and iron, and even these small quantities make a huge
impact on red blood cell count.

The production of new red blood cells increases oxygenation
of essential areas of the body, which in turn improves their
function and boosts overall metabolism.

So, not only will you wake up those hands and feet or warm
up your body with rhubarb, you also have the potential to
process those other foods more quickly.

This may result in weight loss and/or elevated energy.
Thanks, rhubarb, for keeping our bodies buzzing and vital.




4.  
Protects Your Brain

Yes, your brain does need protecting. As it ages, it wears
out, like an old pair of tennis shoes. But the good news is
that you can keep those metaphorical tennis shoes for a
longer period of time, if you treat them right.

Back to your literal brain. Rhubarb has a high vitamin K
content, which protects against the neurological damage
linked to
Alzheimer’s disease. In 2006, Huy PD and co-
researchers at the Institute for Computational Science and
Technology looked at one of the main causes and main cures
of Alzheimer’s disease.

One of the main causes is the building up of amyloid beta (a
kind of protein aggregate) in the body.

And one of the main cures turned out to be a vitamin K3
analogue.

The researchers tested 15 vitamin K3 analogues for their
anti-amyloidogenic (ability to fight against these amyloid
betas) activity.

The results were dramatic and positive.  Those K vitamins
effectively inhibited the aggregation of amyloid beta in the
body, proving it to be an effective therapeutic treatment of
Alzheimer’s disease. But don’t wait until you get old to start
this delicious therapy.

Make a rhubarb smoothie, and think of it as medicinal brain
juice.




5.
Fights against cardiovascular and other diseases with
antioxidants

Rhubarb has what it takes to keep your cells protected. Its
anti-oxidant level is extremely high, giving it the ability to
prevent a host of diseases.

According to a 2006 study by Mehmet Ozturk at the
University of Istanbul, the roots and stems of a certain
species of rhubarb, "Rheum ribes", have an extremely high
antioxidant potential.

The dietary fiber in rhubarb can also remove excess
cholesterol from the blood vessels and arteries, contributing
directly to lowering the risk of
cardiovascular disease.





6.
Lowers Cholesterol

Low cholesterol means good heart health, and good health
overall. In a 1999 study, Goel V. and researchers at the
University of Alberta found that a certain species of rhubarb,
"rheum raponticum", has powerful dietary fiber.

This rhubarb species was found to be hypolipademic (ie, it
takes fat out of the blood).  This rhubarb also increases your
excretion of bile acids, consequentially reducing cholesterol.

If your diet contains food with the potential to raise your
cholesterol, of course, cut down on those foods, but also
balance it out with some rhubarb salad.



7.
Lifts your Spirits and Reduces Depression By 37%

That sadness you feel might not be all in your head. It might
be in your body, too.

Certain foods have the power to keep depression at a safe
distance or at least reduce it, and rhubarb happens to be one
of them.

In 2013, Beydoun MA from the National Institutes of Health
Biomedical Research Center investigated the relationship
between elevated depressive symptoms and antioxidant
stress.

They took cross-sectional data from the National Health and
Nutritional Examination Surveys from 2005 to 2006, from U.
S. adults ages 20 to 85. In total there was complete data
from 1,798 U.S. adults.

They discovered that beta carotene (an active ingredient in
rhubarb) and depression did not go together.

Where there was increased beta carotene, there was
reduced depression: by a figure of an astounding 37%.

Although we know that correlation is not always causation,
this seems to be a pretty convincing figure. If you want to
keep your mood up and prevent future depression, mixing it
up with rhubarb may be the answer. (Read more about
foods that help to lift depression.)



































































Related:
Arthritis - Causes and Top 10 Natural Remedies

Foods That Reduce Blood Pressure

Sugar-the Disease Connection

Foods That Shrink Your Waist

Ideal Weight for Women

Swollen Ankles -Causes and Cures

Tight Bras and Briefs-Health Dangers


Bowel Color-What It Means

Urine Color-What It Means


Home  > Healing Foods  >  
>>Here


DIETS AND FITNESS

HOW MUCH IS TOO MUCH
SALT

HOW MUCH SALT IS IN MY
FOOD

SALT CONTENT OF COMMON
FOODS

150,000 DIE FROM EXCESS
SALT

I HAVE HIGH BLOOD
PRESSURE!

FOODS THAT LOWER YOUR
BLOOD PRESSURE

QUINOA-THE NEW
SUPERFOOD

INFLAMMATION INSIDE
THE BODY

FAT--IT'S ALIVE!

WHY WE GO SOFT IN THE
MIDDLE

WHY EUROPEANS ARE
THINNER

>VEGETARIAN RECIPES


MY HEART ATTACK

CANCER SURVIVORS


MONEY AND BUDGET

RESOURCES

AMERICAN HEART
ASSOCIATION

LINKS AND RESOURCES

About Us

Register

Privacy Policy

Editorial Policy

Contact Us

Disclaimer : All information on www.collectivewizdom.com is for educational purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice. For
specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, please consult your doctor.  
Privacy Policy.  About Us   Contact Us

(c) copyright collectivewizdom.com 2007 -2017 and all prior years. All rights reserved.
Collectivewizdom,LLC is located at 340 S Lemon Ave #2707 Walnut, CA 91789
Subscribe in a reader
Custom Search
COLLECTIVE
WIZDOM.COM

Healthy Body, Healthy Mind, Healthy Life
Rhubarbs are rich in Vitamin K which
helps fight Alzheimer's disease.