Mini-strokes --- Causes and Top 8
Natural Remedies
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October 14, 2012
By Joey Carney, Contributing Columnist


I remember sitting with my grandfather one afternoon on his
porch. Though well into his 60s, he had always been healthy
and was force-fed heath food and doctor’s visits by my
benevolent grandmother. He was out of it this, day, confused
and pacing the porch while looking into the distance. He kept
murmuring, “What was I doing?” Several minutes later in
epiphany he would say, “I’m having a damn TIA!” This he
repeated over and over again, scaring me to death until my
grandmother came home and took him to the hospital. Several
hours later he came home and was fine, making me think that
maybe it wasn’t such a big deal after all.

This wasn’t true. Up to 40 percent of all people who experience
a mini-stroke, or transient ischemic attack (TIA), will go on to
have an actual stroke. Mini-strokes, then, are early warning
signs that a real stroke may be coming. About 795,000 people
in the U.S. have a stroke each year, according to the National
Stroke Association. This is not confined solely to the elderly: 10
to 15 percent of strokes affect people 45 and younger. Among
other factors, males and African Americans are at a greater
risk.  What exactly are mini-strokes and what causes them? Are
there any natural remedies that can help you to lower your risk?

What Are the Symptoms of Mini-strokes?

Many younger or uninformed people who have mini-stroke
symptoms pass them over as a bad headache, or a case of the
flu.

Mini-strokes are temporary interruptions in the blood flow to
your brain.  They sometimes last less than a few minutes, and
never longer than 24 hours. Similar to the symptoms of a real
stroke, mini-stroke symptoms may include: weakness or
numbness on one or both sides of the face, arms or legs;
difficulty speaking or understanding; dizziness; loss of vision in
one or both eyes; a headache, usually severe and beginning
without warning; and difficulty swallowing. Unlike a real stroke,
mini-strokes do not cause brain damage.


What are the Causes of Mini-strokes?

A TIA is caused when blood flowing to the brain is stopped and
then starts again. This is usually caused by a blood clot, or in
some cases, by a small bleed in the brain. Without the flow of
oxygen to this beloved organ, our cells start to die. Once the
blood starts flowing again, the signs of a mini-stroke may
disappear. The reason for the clot does not disappear and
further clots may block the brain again, temporarily causing
another TIA or permanently causing a stroke. There are a
number of things a doctor can do; it is especially important
when the TIA has just taken place. However, stopping a future
stroke is largely preventative: living long may depend upon
lifestyle choices.


Top 8 Natural Remedies

























1.        Avoid Tobacco to Prevent Stroke.  A 2011 study from
Glasgow Caledonian University points out that lifestyle factors
such as smoking are a leading cause of mini-strokes, easily
preventable.

2.        
Cutting Back on Caffeine Lowers Blood Pressure and
Stroke.
Like tobacco, caffeine increases blood pressure and
hence the chance of a stroke. A 2012 study from the University
of Western Australia, while supporting the belief that high
amounts of caffeine increase one’s chances of a stroke,
maintains that black or green tea (low in caffeine and high in
antioxidants) can actually decrease one’s chance of having a
TIA.  (Read more about the
health benefits of green tea.)

3.        
Exercise regularly. At least 30 minutes a day, 5 days a
week, you should do some form of exercise. While exercise
raises blood pressure temporarily, it lowers it in the long run. A
2012 study by the Cleveland Clinic Neurological Institute found
that almost 40% of their recurrent stroke and TIA patients
received inadequate exercise.  

4.        
Sleep 6-9 Hours Every Night. A 2003 Freeman Hospital
study affirms that there is a correlation between daytime
sleepiness and stroke occurrence. Stress can lead to both
strokes and mini-strokes. Sleeping well is one of the best ways
of staying healthy and in a good mood.   

5.        
Don’t Drink Alcohol Excessively.  In a 2011 article about
TIA and stroke prevention, the Spanish Society of Neurology
lists alcohol in its top 10 list of causes.  

6.        
Lose Weight If You Are Overweight or Obese. Obesity is
one of the leading, and most easily preventable, causes of mini-
strokes. A 2012 study by Capital Medical University in Beijing
investigated the relationship between escalating body weight
and the occurrence of strokes in recent years in China. They
concluded that strokes love potato chips.

7.        
Eat a Healthy Diet to Lower Blood Pressure and
Cholesterol
.  The mantra to remember is "fruits, vegetables and
whole grains." Lower the amount of refined foods and red
meat. Cut down on salt. A 2003 study by the Munich-
Harlaching State Hospital stressed lifestyle and preventive
methods for preventing TIAs. Foremost on their list was a
healthy diet and controlling cholesterol.  

8.        
Vitamins Are Allies Against Ministrokes. Not to be
overlooked, the University of Maryland Medical Center posted a
list of habits that affect your risk for mini-strokes in their 2011
report on TIAs. Among the most important were a daily
multivitamin, magnesium citrate, Omega-3 fatty acids (ask your
doctor if you are taking blood-thinners, Omega-3 fatty acids
increase the risk of bleeding), and vitamin C (studies have
found that low levels of vitamin C are associated with greater
risk of stroke).





Related Links
Ideal Breakfast to Prevent Stroke

Top 10 Tips to Prevent Stroke

Best Exercises to Lower Blood Sugar

Break Through Your Diet Plateau

How Many Calories Do I Burn

Quinoa-The New Superfood?
Break Through Your Diet Plateau

How Many Calories Do I Burn

Ideal Breakfast for Hypoglycemia


DIETS AND FITNESS


BOWEL MOVEMENTS

INTESTINES-KEEP THEM
HEALTHY

QUINOA-THE NEW
SUPERFOOD

HOW MUCH IS TOO MUCH
SALT

HOW MUCH SALT IS IN MY
FOOD

SALT CONTENT OF COMMON
FOODS

150,000 DIE FROM EXCESS
SALT

I HAVE HIGH BLOOD
PRESSURE!

FOODS THAT LOWER YOUR
BLOOD PRESSURE

INFLAMMATION INSIDE
THE BODY

FAT--IT'S ALIVE!

WHY WE GO SOFT IN THE
MIDDLE

WHY EUROPEANS ARE
THINNER

>VEGETARIAN RECIPES


MY HEART ATTACK

CANCER SURVIVORS
BRAIN HEALTH

>CROSSWORD
PUZZLES
>LEARNING
>MEMORY LOSS


MONEY AND BUDGET

RESOURCES

AMERICAN HEART
ASSOCIATION

LINKS AND RESOURCES



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oranges and lemons help prevent stroke
Vitamin C in fruits such as oranges and lemons can help you lower your risk for
mini-strokes.
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