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Metabolic Syndrome ---Global Body Warming

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Last updated March 9, 2017 (originally published January 20, 2008)

By Susan M. Callahan, Associate Editor and Featured Columnist


A funny thing has happened on the way to progress in the 21st
century.  What used to be thought of as a problem unique to
Americans--- obesity-- is, well, spreading.  Obesity defined as the
composed of fat, afflicts 33% of Americans.  The pre-condition to
obesity, merely being overweight, describes two-thirds of all
Americans.  Two out of three of us.  That leaves only one out of
three of us with a normal body weight.

Even our children are among the most obese in the world, with
estimates that as many as 33% of all our children can classified as
overweight or technically obese. (Read more about the
ideal
weight for children of different heights.)

We have chronicled the causes and dangers of obsesity. See
Fat--
It's Alive.  Being overweight is a significant risk factor for  
diabetes, heart disease and stroke. Being overweight and carrying
fat around your waistline is the most reliable predictor of your life
expectancy. (Read more about what your
ideal waist size should
be.)

According to a study from the Université Pierre-et-Marie-Curie in
Paris, France,2012, there is a strong link between metabolic
syndrome and your risk for
urinary incontinence. If you begin to
notice that you are urinating before you can get to the bathroom,
check the list below to see if you also have metabolic syndrome.

But less well understood is the condition that leads the body to
store too much fat.  
























What Is Metabolic Syndrome?

The group of risk factors underlying diabetes, heart disease and
other related conditions such as
hardening of the arteries is called
"metabolic syndrome".  The American Heart Association lists the
following risks factors and conditions as indicative of metabolic
syndrome:

1. Abdominal obesity (excessive fat tissue in and around the
abdomen). According to the 2012 study from the Université
Pierre-et-Marie-Curie in Paris, France, if your waist circumference
is larger than 102 centimeters (over 40 inches), then this counts
as one indication of metabolic syndrome. (Read more about
normal waist size for women and men of different heights.)

Many studies have pointed out why having extra abdominal fat is
particularly harmful to your health over the ling term.  Fat is not
inert as many people wrongly believe.
Fat actually is a living
substance, which emits hormones
. These hormones disrupt the
balance of insulin in your body and increase your risk for
developing diabetes and heart disease.


2. Atherogenic dyslipidemia (blood fat disorders — high
triglycerides, low HDL cholesterol and high LDL cholesterol — that
foster plaque buildups in artery walls). Here, you should be
concerned in your trigyleride count is greater than 150 mg/dl, if
your HDL ("good" cholesterol) is less than 40 mg/dl
or if your
LDL level is above 100 mg/dl.


3. Elevated
blood pressure. For this factor, the French study set
the cut off at a systolic (top number) blood pressure greater than
130 or a diastolic (bottom number) blood pressure greater than
85.

4. Insulin resistance or glucose intolerance (the body can’t
properly use insulin or blood sugar)

5. Prothrombotic state (e.g., high fibrinogen or plasminogen
activator inhibitor–1 in the blood)

6. Proinflammatory state (e.g., elevated C-reactive protein in the
blood).

According to the
American Heart Association, at least 50% of
Americans have Metabolic Syndrome.
Belly fat and insulin
resistance are the dominant factors in the syndrome.

Evidence is growing that metabolic syndrome is spreading around
the globe.  Recents reports from the World Health Organization
and the United Nations reveal that, as Africans have developed
more Western eating patterns, they are developing higher
incidences of diabetes.  The same patterns are emerging in parts
of Europe and the Far East.  
In the United Kingdom, for example,
a
2014 UK National Sizing Survey reported that since the 1950's,
the waistline for the average woman has grown by 7 inches.


In Japan, changes from the traditional rice and fish-based diet to
American-style fast food burgers and fries has led many in that
nation to call for a new focus on healthy eating.

As reported to CBS News, Japan's health authorities are getting
worried."I don't know for how long Japan can maintain the
world's highest longevity," says Yukio Yamori, director of the
International Center for Research on Primary Prevention of
Cardiovascular Diseases. "If eating habits change, life expectancy
will shorten and this has already been made clear."

Whether Japan or Europe will be more successful than America is
battling metabolic syndrome remains unclear. What is clear is that
metabolic syndrome, Global Body Warming, may be as great a
threat to our long-term survival as the disappearance of the
glacial caps.

Let's call it "Our Silent Inconvenient Truth". There are of course,
things you can do. Walking just 45 minutes a day will reduce both
your blood pressure and your waist line.  New studies have found
that even standing up more during the day has health benefits,
including decreasing your risk of metabolic syndrome.























































Related:
Standing Up More Reduces Metabolic Syndrome
Top 10 Health Benefits of Walking
Normal Waist Size
Ideal Weight for Children of Different Heights

Foods That Shrink Your Waist
My Heart Attack --index of personal stories
Foods That Lower Your Blood Pressure
Ideal Breakfast for Diabetics
Ideal Breakfast for Heart Health

Index of All Articles on This
Site

BRAIN HEALTH

>CROSSWORD
PUZZLES
>LEARNING
>MEMORY LOSS

DIETS AND FITNESS

HOW MUCH IS TOO MUCH
SALT

HOW MUCH SALT IS IN MY
FOOD

SALT CONTENT OF COMMON
FOODS

150,000 DIE FROM EXCESS
SALT

I HAVE HIGH BLOOD
PRESSURE!

INFLAMMATION INSIDE
THE BODY

FAT--IT'S ALIVE!

WHY WE GO SOFT IN THE
MIDDLE

WHY EUROPEANS ARE
THINNER

>VEGETARIAN RECIPES


MY HEART ATTACK

CANCER SURVIVORS


MONEY AND BUDGET



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Growing levels of obesity have increased the
incidence of metabolic syndrome.