Ideal Breakfast to Prevent Stroke

August 18, 2009 (last updated January 18, 2015)

By Susan M. Callahan, Associate Editor and Featured Columnist
Related Links:
Mini-Strokes-Causes and Top 8 Natural Remedies

Stroke News

Top 10 Tips to Prevent Stroke

Complex Migraine or Stroke -Learn the Difference

Bells Palsy Mimics Stroke-Causes and Remedies

Dystextia-Garbled Text Messages Can Indicate a Stroke

Foods That Lower Blood Sugar
Ideal Dinner for Diabetics
Directory of Sugar Content in Foods
Ideal Breakfast for Heart Health
Why Americans Read In Bathrooms-The Hidden Epidemic of Constipation
Bowels -3 Keys to Normal Bowels
Break Through Your Diet Plateau
How Many Calories Do I Burn
Fiber Rich Foods
Quinoa-The New Superfood?
Fish Oil Benefits-Let Me Count the Ways
Normal Fasting Blood Sugar
My Heart Attack-personal stories from survivors
Fat-It's Alive!
Foods That Reduce Your Blood Pressure
Ideal Breakfast for Losing Weight
Waist Size Matters
Six Pack Abs Step by Step
Americans Are Dangerously Sleep Deprived
Ideal Breakfast for Hypoglycemia

What should you eat for breakfast to prevent stroke?
According to the American Heart Association, over 795,000
Americans suffer a stroke or mini-stroke (ischemic stroke) each
year. Another 11 million Americans suffer from so-called "silent
strokes" in which they experience few outward symptoms,
according to Dr. Megan Leary of the UCLA Medical Center.
Stroke and diet are closely linked. Are there foods you can eat
to prevent stroke? Are there foods you should avoid to prevent
strokes?  Is there an ideal breakfast for stroke prevention?

Several important studies have uncovered the answer.
Researchers have  discovered that diets high in certain minerals
and vitamins actually reduce your risk of a first stroke or, if you
have already suffered a stroke, greatly decrease your risk for
suffering a second stroke.

Potassium is the key.  In 2002, a team of researchers from the
University of Hawaii and other universities conducted a
mega-study of 5,888 patients to review the possible connection
between diets high in potassium and risk of stroke. What they
found was that people who ate diets high in potassium--
meaning over 3500 mg a day-- were at the lowest risk for
stroke. Compared to the high-potassium dieters, those who
consumed the least amount of potassium faced a 1.5 to 2.5
times greater risk of stroke.  

In another study from the University of University of California
at San Diego, researchers studied a group of 859 men and
women and monitored their diets for potassium intake. After 12
years, there were 24 deaths from stroke. Men with the least
amount of potassium in their daily diets were 2.6 times more
likely to suffer stroke than men whose diets were richest in
potassium. Women with the least amount of potassium were
almost 5 times more likely to suffer stroke.

How Much Potassium Should We Eat?

The amount of potassium you should eat varies depending on
the government authority. The US Food and Drug
Administration recommends a minimum of 3500 milligrams per
day. This is the same as the UK Recommended Daily Amount.
The Australian Government National Health and Research
Coouncil recommends 3800 milligrams per day for men over
the age of 19 and 2800 milligrams of potassium per day for
women over the age of 19.

But the US Institute of Medicine's Food and Nutrition Board
recommends a much higher amount --- 4700 milligrams per day.
Canada's Food Guide also recommends that people over the
age of 14 include 4700 milligrams of potassium per day in their
diets.

Unfortunately, most of us have diets which are woefully short
of the minimum  potassium our bodies need. The average
American  is estimated to eat foods with less than half the 3500
mg daily recommended by the Food and Drug Administration.
In addition to potassium, studies have also found that it's
important to include magnesium in your diet to prevent stroke.

Drawn from these research studies, we can recommend the
following ideal breakfast for keeping your risk of stroke to a
minimum:






























1.
Cantelopes. Start your breakfast with a quarter slice of
cantelope. Packed with 900 mg of potassium, it has about 20%
of the 3500 mg of the daily potassium intake that the Food and
Drug Administration recommends.


2.
Banana Shake. A small banana has about 450 mg of
potassium. Blend a banana with a half a cup of skim milk and a
cup of low fat vanilla yogurt to give your diet a potassium
boost and to help control your weight. Eight ounces of yogurt
has 579 milligrams of potassium.

So, whipping up a banana yogurt smoothie can deliver up to
1029 milligrams of potassium, almost 1/3 of what you need for
the day.

3.
Walnut Muffin.  A small walnut whole grain muffin can boost
your total magnesium and potassium. Walnuts contain 441
milligrams of potassium per 100 grams of nuts.

4.
Avoid Fried Fish. A new 2010 study from Emory University
suggests that eating fried fish may account for the high rates of
stroke among Americans living in certain states. People who
live in the so-called "stroke belt" -- North Carolina, South
Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Tennessee, Arkansas
and Louisiana -- are 30% more likely to eat fried fish than the
rest of the country and 40% more likely to suffer from stroke.

5.
Spinach and Dark, Leafy Greens. A cup of cooked spinach
has 839 milligrams of potassium. How to use this for breakfast?
Try a spinach omelet. Beat two egg whites or one whole egg
and one egg white. Add carmelized onions, red peppers and
chopped spinach. Add a bit of feta cheese to taste.

[Update:

6.
Oranges and Vitamin C Helps Prevent Stroke.

A 2011 study from the University of Maryland Medical Center
has found that those who eat the least amount of fruit with
Vitamin C are at the greatest risk for suffering a stroke.  Add
oranges, kiwis, and other fruit high in Vitamin C to your
breakfast to boost your protection against stroke.]

Related Links

Top 10 Tips to Prevent Stroke

Best Exercises to Lower Blood Sugar

Break Through Your Diet Plateau

How Many Calories Do I Burn

Quinoa-The New Superfood?
Break Through Your Diet Plateau

How Many Calories Do I Burn

Ideal Breakfast for Hypoglycemia


DIETS AND FITNESS









BOWEL MOVEMENTS

INTESTINES-KEEP THEM
HEALTHY

QUINOA-THE NEW
SUPERFOOD

HOW MUCH IS TOO MUCH
SALT

HOW MUCH SALT IS IN MY
FOOD

SALT CONTENT OF COMMON
FOODS

150,000 DIE FROM EXCESS
SALT

I HAVE HIGH BLOOD
PRESSURE!

FOODS THAT LOWER YOUR
BLOOD PRESSURE

INFLAMMATION INSIDE
THE BODY

FAT--IT'S ALIVE!

WHY WE GO SOFT IN THE
MIDDLE

WHY EUROPEANS ARE
THINNER

>VEGETARIAN RECIPES


MY HEART ATTACK

CANCER SURVIVORS
BRAIN HEALTH

>CROSSWORD
PUZZLES
>LEARNING
>MEMORY LOSS


MONEY AND BUDGET

RESOURCES

AMERICAN HEART
ASSOCIATION

LINKS AND RESOURCES



Home > Conditions > Stroke
> Here
COLLECTIVE
WIZDOM.COM

Healthy Body, Healthy Mind, Healthy Life

About Us   

Register

Privacy Policy

Editorial Policy

Meet Our Medical  and Fitness Team

Contact Us

Disclaimer : All information on www.collectivewizdom.com is for educational purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice. For
specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, please consult your doctor.  

(c) copyright collectivewizdom.com 2007 -201
6 and all prior years. All rights reserved.
Collectivewizdom,LLC is located at 340 S Lemon Ave #2707 Walnut, CA 91789  
Subscribe in a reader
Google