How Vinegar Can Help You Manage
Your Blood Sugar

Related Links:

Foods That Keep Blood Sugar Steady

Ideal Breakfast for Diabetics

Ideal Dinner for Diabetics

Eating Your Vegetables Before Your Carbs Can Help Control Blood Sugar

Losing This Much Weight Can Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Directory of Sugar Content in Foods

Blood Sugar Levels During Pregnancy -What's Normal?

Type 2 Diabetes -Causes and Top 10 Natural Remedies

Cinnamon-Top 10 Health Benefits

Mushrooms Help Control Blood Sugar

Foods That Reduce Your Blood Pressure

Eggs Lower Diabetes Risk by 33%

Gum Disease Increases Your Risk of Diabetes

Waist Size Matters
Six Pack Abs Step by Step
Americans Are Dangerously Sleep Deprived

April 12, 2016
By Ariadne Weinberg,  Featured Columnist

[Health and fitness articles are reviewed by Registered Nurses, Certified
fitness trainers and other members of our Editorial Board]




Oil and vinegar is a great combination for a salad. Some olive
oil and a little balsamic vinegar with your favorite mix of
vegetables makes any day better. But did you know it can also
keep your blood sugar levels more stable? For over a century,
people have been looking at the potential of vinegar to manage
insulin as well as lipid levels, and even lower cholesterol. The
results give us an optimistic outlook. Studies have shown that
vinegar delays gastric emptying and lowers postprandial blood
glucose and insulin levels.

Vinegar’s superpowers have been known for years, but they
were a little different in ancient times. Vinegar, (the word is
derived from the French “vin aigre”, meaning “sour wine”)
was thought to have been discovered in 5000 B.C. by a
courtier in Babylonia, when grape juice was accidentally left
out and found to be a useful food preservative. It has been a
tool of both love and war. In 50 B.C., Cleopatra dissolved
precious pearls in vinegar and offered her love potion to
Anthony. Hannibal of Carthrage, a military strategist and
leader, even used vinegar to dissolve boulders.

These days, the magical salad ingredient doesn’t quite have the
same Hollywood flair, but it’s awfully practical and delicious.

Vinegar manages your blood glucose levels and makes you feel
great. How? There are varying theories, including suppression
of disaccharides activity, delayed gastric emptying, enhanced
glucose uptake, and the ability for glycogen repletion in the
liver and muscles.

What we do know is that many tests out there prove its
potential for helping diabetics (those with serious blood sugar
issues) as well as perfectly healthy people.

Given its potential to even out those blood sugar levels, it’s
worth considering adding a touch of vinegar to daily meals to
lose weight and maintain energy throughout the day.



Diabetes Intercepted: Vinegar to the Rescue!



























Vinegar has been found to be a great life hack for those with
the wonkiest of insulin production. Folks with
Type 2 diabetes,
as well as those who are at risk for Type 2 diabetes, have to be
a little more cautious than the rest of the population.

Luckily, the addition of a splash of vinegar could be the key. In
a 2013 study from the Arizona State University, Carol S.
Johnson and researchers aimed to test the effects of vinegar
on markers of type 2 diabetes on at-risk adults. They
conducted a 12-week pilot study in which 14 participants
ingested 750 mg of acetic acid as a vinegar drink, or a control
pill of 40 mg of acetic acid, twice a day at mealtime.

Blood glucose levels were recorded once daily. The scientists
discovered that both amounts of vinegar have "anti-glycemic"
effects for adults who were at risk for Type 2 diabetes. What
this means is that the vinegar stopped the normal rise in blood
sugar that occurs after you eat.

Vinegar can also work for those who already have Type 1
diabetes.

In 2010, Panayota Mitrou from Attikon University in Greece
along with other researchers looked into the effect of vinegar
on diabetics.

The ten test subjects were men with Type 1 diabetes, with an
average age of 32, who were typically treated with rapid-acting
insulin pre-prandially and long-acting insulin once daily.

After an overnight fast, they consumed a vinegar mixture (30
ml vinegar, 20 ml water) or a placebo (50 ml water) five
minutes before eating bread, cheese, turkey, ham, orange
juice, butter, and a cereal bar (566 kcals). Blood samples were
collected pre-prandially and at 30, 60, 90, 120, 180, and 240
minutes.

All of the results indicated that the vinegar decreased
hyperglycemia after the meal.


Vinegar Is Good for the Healthy, too

Even if you are in good shape and have totally normal blood
glucose levels, you still want to feel as good as you can and
improve your health.

In Iran, researchers wanted to find out what benefits a
traditional ingredient, honey vinegar syrup, had. In 2014, SM
Rishdri Derakhshandeh from the University of Medical Sciences
in Isfahan examined the impact of honey vinegar consumption
on
glycemic parameters and lipid profiles in non-obese healthy
adults.

During the 4-week study, people were divided into two groups:
An intervention and control group. In the intervention group,
they received a cup of honey vinegar syrup for an evening
snack (250 cc of syrup contains 21.66 grams of honey
vinegar.) They found that honey vinegar syrup increased
fasting insulin level and decreased total cholesterol level in the
intervention group.

It would seem that vinegar has potential in the morning, too. It
isn’t just an evening snack, but a good wake-up call.

In many parts of the world, we have bread for breakfast:
croissants, toast, pancakes. It’s good to fill your tummy when
you first greet the world, but it can also bring blood sugar
levels up.

Vinegar can help regulate that. In 2005, Elin Ostman from Lund
University, Sweden examined whether acetic acid in vinegar
lowered the glycemic index of a bread meal.

Twelve healthy volunteers were given three different amounts
of vinegar (18, 23, and 28 mmol of acetic acid, respectively)
along with a portion of white wheat bread with 50 grams of
carbohydrates. They ate this as breakfast after an overnight
fast.

After 120 minutes, blood samples were taken for an analysis of
glucose and insulin levels. After 30 minutes, they found a
significant dose-response relation for blood-glucose and serum-
insulin. The higher the acetic acid level, the lower the metabolic
responses.

Compared with the bread reference meal, the highest level of
vinegar lowered blood-glucose response at 30 and 45 minutes,
and the low and medium levels lowered it at 30 and 45
minutes. This shows interesting potential for fermented and
pickled products being incorporated into your diet. Pickle
sandwich anyone?


But Be Careful  --- Don't Overdo the Vinegar

Vinegar isn’t the best for all of us. And remember the rule that
applies to everything: Everything in moderation.

For those of you who have indigestion, ulcers, or a narrow
esophagus, drinking vinegar is a nope. It can upset the
stomach and throat. If you are taking blood thinners, diuretics,
or medication for diabetes, it’s also probably best avoided.
Consult your doctor.

In other cases, vinegar drunk in high quantities may cause
dangerous effects.

For example, ingesting too much of it will likely damage your
teeth, either by eroding enamel or causing cavities. A 2014
study by LW Zheng from Sichuan University in Chengdu, China,
revealed that white vinegar could be especially harmful. He
examined bovine tooth blocks, testing four substances on
them: white vinegar, apple cider vinegar, 30% hydrogen
peroxide, and de-ionized water. The white vinegar had the
most noticeable decreases in hardness, changes in color, and
morphological characteristics.

Other possible reactions include heartburn, nausea, and in rare
cases, damage to the esophagus. In most cases, drinking
vinegar straight and in high quantities has been the main
problem. As well as esophagus injury, if you drink waaaaaay
too much vinegar (as in the case of one woman, referenced in
a Medscape General Medicine Article, who drank a cup of
vinegar every day for six years), it will lower potassium levels.
Acetic acid means that extra potassium must be excreted for
digestion, and low potassium levels cause fatigue, constipation,
muscle damage, and irregular heartbeat.

The takeaway message: If it doesn’t interfere with your current
health conditions, your favorite vinegar is a great thing to add
to daily meals in small portions. Or, if you find that it does
affect your stomach, try diluting it with some water.

Enjoy your vinegar exploration, whether as a salad dressing or
fermented vegetable. It’s delish.  



































Related:

Ideal Breakfast for Diabetics

Ideal Dinner for Diabetics /Foods That Shrink Your Waist

Ideal Weight for Women

Break Through Your Diet Plateau

How Many Calories Do I Burn

Quinoa-The New Superfood?

Break Through Your Diet Plateau

How Many Calories Do I Burn


DIETS AND FITNESS

BOWEL MOVEMENTS

INTESTINES-KEEP THEM
HEALTHY

QUINOA-THE NEW
SUPERFOOD

HOW MUCH IS TOO MUCH
SALT

HOW MUCH SALT IS IN MY
FOOD

SALT CONTENT OF COMMON
FOODS

150,000 DIE FROM EXCESS
SALT

I HAVE HIGH BLOOD
PRESSURE!

FOODS THAT LOWER YOUR
BLOOD PRESSURE

INFLAMMATION INSIDE
THE BODY

FAT--IT'S ALIVE!

WHY WE GO SOFT IN THE
MIDDLE

WHY EUROPEANS ARE
THINNER

>VEGETARIAN RECIPES


MY HEART ATTACK

CANCER SURVIVORS
BRAIN HEALTH

>CROSSWORD
PUZZLES
>LEARNING
>MEMORY LOSS


MONEY AND BUDGET

RESOURCES

AMERICAN HEART
ASSOCIATION

LINKS AND RESOURCES



Home  > Healing Foods  >
You Are Here
COLLECTIVE
WIZDOM.COM

Healthy Body, Healthy Mind, Healthy Life
script type="text/javascript">


About Us   

Register

Privacy Policy

Editorial Policy

Meet Our Medical and Fitness Experts

Contact Us

Disclaimer : All information on www.collectivewizdom.com is for educational purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice. For
specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, please consult your doctor.  
(c) copyright collectivewizdom.com 2007 -2016 and all prior years. All rights reserved

Collectivewizdom,LLC is located at 340 S Lemon Ave #2707 Walnut, CA 91789
Subscribe in a reader
Looking for a simple way to control blood sugar?  Eating your
vegetables before you eat your carbs can be an easy way to control
blood sugar.  
Read more.