Halt the Slide from Early Alzheimer's
--- Causes and Top 7 Natural Remedies
Related Links
Alzheimer's Disease -An Ideal Prevention Diet

Is the Low Carb Diet the Cure to Alzheimer's?

Alzheimer's - Top 10 Remedies That Help

Kicking in Your Sleep and Other Unusual Signs of Alzheimer's

Dancing Reduces Dementia Risk by 76%

Is the Cure to Alzheimer's in Your Gut?

Olive Oil Helps  Prevent Alzheimer's But Canola Oil May Cause It

Why Do I Forget Things?-Causes and Top 10 Natural Remedies

How to Improve Your Memory

Eating Blueberries Improves Memory in Early Dementia by 41%

10 Ways That Singing Beats Alzheimer's Disease

Curry Prevents Alzheimer's- New Report

Why Is My Elderly Mother So Angry? - Causes and Top 7 Remedies

Vascular Dementia -Causes and Remedies

Thyroid Brain Fog Has Alzheimer's-like Symptoms-Herbs Can Help

How to Raise Your IQ Naturally

Top 10 Things That Can Grow More Brain Cells

How to Unclog Your Arteries -Top 10 Natural Remedies

Portobello Mushrooms Help Protect Your Brain Against Dementia

Why Europeans Are Thinner


Last updated June 16, 2018, originally published May 17, 2017

By Louise Carr, Associate Editor and Featured Columnist

[Health and fitness articles are reviewed by our team of
Doctors and Registered Nurses, Certified fitness trainers and
other members of our Editorial Board.]








It may be hard to know at first if you or a loved one is
suffering from early Alzheimer’s, but the fact is that every 66
seconds someone in the US develops the disease, according to
the Alzheimer's Association. So there is a possibility that
symptoms like forgetfulness and difficulty with everyday tasks
point to the early stages of this devastating condition. While
Alzheimer’s cannot currently be cured, if it is diagnosed early
enough there are more opportunities to plan for the future and
map out strategies so that the person can live well for longer,
including natural strategies.

What Are the Different Stages of Alzheimer’s Disease?

Alzheimer’s normally takes some time to develop into what you
may most commonly recognize as Alzheimer’s disease. There
are three mains stages, from the early stage, otherwise known
as mild Alzheimer’s, to moderate/ middle stage, through to
severe, late stage Alzheimer’s.

The disease may progress through these stages in four years,
eight years or up to 20 years – everyone is different, and the
symptoms at each stage will also be different. Generally,
though, the symptoms worsen over time and the disease
actually starts many years before any symptoms are shown –
this time period is called preclinical Alzheimer’s.

How Does Early Alzheimer’s Differ from Late-Stage Alzheimer’
s?

In early Alzheimer’s, your loved one will probably still function
independently and will drive, take part in hobbies, go to work,
and do their regular social activities. But aside from this, they
may experience memory lapses that become more noticeable as
time goes by.

Other signs that may signal early Alzheimer’s include difficulty
remembering names, difficulty performing work or social tasks
that were previously easy, forgetting things that were just said
or read, losing objects, and having problems planning and
organizing things.

Is someone you know losing their sense of smell? A 2015 study
from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester links a decreased sense of
smell with the early stages of Alzheimer’s. The study looked at
1,430 people with an average age of 79.5 years. It is possible
that the neurodegenerative changes in the brain involve the
sense of smell as well as memory.

A detailed medical questioning carried out by a doctor will
diagnose early Alzheimer’s.

Compare this to severe moderate Alzheimer’s, where signs
include greater difficulty working with figures or managing
bills, increasing frustration, confusing words, moodiness,
withdrawal, forgetting key personal details and dates, changes
in sleep patterns, and changes in behavior including compulsive
behaviors and repetitive gestures.

With severe Alzheimer's disease, the late stage, people lose the
ability to respond to their environment, lack the ability to
control movement, to speak, and to walk.

In the early stages of the disease there are things you can do
to slow down the progression of the disease so you and your
loved ones can more effectively plan for the future and also live
a fuller life for longer. We looked at recent research to find out
the most promising natural strategies for halting the slide of
this progressive disease.




























1.
Music and Meditation Help Slow the Process of Cognitive
Decline in Early Alzheimer’s

Listening to music and taking part in meditation activities have
been shown to help improve measures of memory and
cognitive functioning in adults with cognitive decline and early
Alzheimer’s, according to a 2017 study from West Virginia
University in Morgantown.

The researchers looked at Kirtan Kriya meditation, which is a
form of yoga meditation, and music listening and their effects
on the impact of cognitive decline. 60 adults with early stage
cognitive decline were assigned to either a program of Kirtan
Kriya meditation or a music listening program. They practiced
their assignment for 12 minutes each day for three months.

The results of the study showed significant improvements in
subjective memory function and objective cognitive
performance for both Kirtan Kriya meditation and music. The
programs were also found to positively improve sleep and
mood, which was a further benefit to those experiencing the
early stages of cognitive decline.

2.
Develop Your Bilingual Capabilities to Halt Early Alzheimer’s
Decline

New research shows that people who have been bilingual for
many years use their brains more efficiently and this can
contribute to an increased ability to resist the signs of dementia
and cognitive aging.

The 2017 study from the Université de Montréal in Canada
looked at brain connections in 20 seniors using brain imaging.

The research showed that after years of managing two
languages, or more, the brain becomes more efficient at
selecting relevant information and discarding information that
distracts from the task in hand. This benefits the brain by
allowing it to conserve resources and use fewer brain
resources, including minimizing the reliance on the frontal
regions which are more vulnerable to aging.

3.
Slow the Progression of Early Alzheimer’s with Personalized
Treatment

A 2016 study from the Buck Institute on Research and Aging in
Novato demonstrates that a highly personalized treatment plan
involving lifestyle changes, medication, and brain stimulation
successfully reverses memory lose in some people with early
Alzheimer’s.

Doctors call this the MEND program and the results from this
study have so far been sustained for two years. The program is
a 36-point system based on highly specific and individualized
changes to diet, sleep, exercise, medications, vitamins, and
brain stimulation. The study only involved 10 people, so more
research is needed into this area.

4.
Does Drinking Alcohol Slow the Progress of Early-Stage
Alzheimer’s?

Recent research has shown that moderate alcohol intake in
early stage Alzheimer’s is linked to a reduced risk of death.

The 2015 study from the University of Copenhagen in Denmark
demonstrates that 2-3 units of alcohol a day was linked to a 77
percent lowered risk of death. The researchers looked at 321
people from the Danish Alzheimer's Intervention Study
(DAISY) who had early stage dementia or Alzheimer’s disease,
and they are not entirely sure why this link should be present
in people with Alzheimer’s.

Heavy drinking, on the other hand, has been linked to an
increased risk of cognitive decline as well as brain damage and
cancer.

5.
Your Own Brain Could Help Halt the Progression of Early
Alzheimer’s

A 2014 study from the University of California shows that in
some people, the brain has a special way of compensating for
the damage caused by the build-up of beta-amyloid protein
deposits in the brain. Some people may be naturally more
inclined to slow down the progress of early stage dementia and
they do this by recruiting extra brain circuits.

Researchers think that “people who spend a lifetime involved in
cognitively stimulating activity have brains that are better able
to adapt to potential damage.” So it makes sense to maximize
the work of your brain in early life so you are better able to
withstand the rigors of brain aging when you are older. In the
study, researchers looked at the brain imaging of 71 people as
they carried out mental tasks.

6.
Vinpocetine May Help Slow Brain Decline in Early Alzheimer’s

Vinpocetine comes from vincamine, a component which is
found in the common periwinkle flowering plant as well as
other seeds from African plants.

Studies have shown that vinpocetine may help people suffering
from mild to moderate Alzheimer’s. A 1991 study from the
University of Surrey in the UK looked at 203 people with mild to
moderate dementia over 16 weeks and found that there was
significant benefit in the treated group. However, due to
limitations in the study, further research is needed before
vinpocetine can be regarded as a proven treatment.

7.
Can Vitamin E Slow the Progression of Alzheimer’s Disease?

A 1997 study from Columbia University College of Physicians
and Surgeons, New York shows that 2000 IU a day of vitamin E
for patients with Alzheimer's disease of moderate severity
slowed the progression of the disease. However, other studies
have failed to find this same link, and a large study of over
39,000 women (2006, Channing Laboratory, Boston)
concluded that vitamin E did not reduce the risk of general
mental decline.


8.
Blueberries Improve Two Kinds of Memory in Early
Dementia Patients


Early dementia patients who drank blueberry juice for 12
weeks saw their paired associative memory and word recall
improve. Paired associative memory improved by 41% and
word recall improved by 33%, according to a 2011 study from
the University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center.



[Update:
Extra virgin oil helps the brain ti clean itself, helping to prevent
Alzheimer's disease. ]























































































Related:
Alzheimer's Disease -An Ideal Prevention Diet

Dancing Reduces Dementia Risk By 76%

Why Do I Forget Things?-Causes and Top 10 Natural Remedies

Improve Your Memory- Simple Steps

Foods That Shrink Your Waist /

Foods That Fight Depression

How to Raise Your IQ Naturally
COLLECTIVE
WIZDOM.COM

Healthy Body, Healthy Mind, Healthy Life


Home   >  Conditions   >  
Alzheimer's  > You Are Here

About Us

Register

Privacy Policy

Editorial Policy

Contact Us

Disclaimer : All information on www.collectivewizdom.com is for educational purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice. For
specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, please consult your doctor.  

(c) copyright collectivewizdom.com 2007 -2018 and all prior years. All rights reserved.
Collectivewizdom,LLC is located at 340 S Lemon Ave #2707 Walnut, CA 91789
Subscribe in a reader
Google


DIETS AND FITNESS


BOWEL MOVEMENTS

INTESTINES-KEEP THEM
HEALTHY

QUINOA-THE NEW
SUPERFOOD

HOW MUCH IS TOO MUCH
SALT

HOW MUCH SALT IS IN MY
FOOD

SALT CONTENT OF COMMON
FOODS

150,000 DIE FROM EXCESS
SALT

I HAVE HIGH BLOOD
PRESSURE!

FOODS THAT LOWER YOUR
BLOOD PRESSURE

INFLAMMATION INSIDE
THE BODY

FAT--IT'S ALIVE!

WHY WE GO SOFT IN THE
MIDDLE

WHY EUROPEANS ARE
THINNER


MY HEART ATTACK

CANCER SURVIVORS
BRAIN HEALTH

>CROSSWORD
PUZZLES
>LEARNING
>MEMORY LOSS


MONEY AND BUDGET

RESOURCES

AMERICAN HEART
ASSOCIATION

LINKS AND RESOURCES
A compound in the common periwinkle plant
may slow Alzheimer's disease.
almonds fight alzheimer's disease