Giant Cell Arteritis --- Do Any Natural
Remedies Help?
Related Links
Top 10 Natural Remedies to Unclog Your Arteries

Hardened Arteries?-Here Are Foods That Help

Orange Juice Helps Reverse Artery Damage Caused by Smoking

Foods That Lower Blood Pressure

Arteries-How to Keep Them Healthy

Foods That Lower Your Cholesterol

Coronary Calcification - Causes and Top 7 Natural Remedies

Eating Fruit Every Day Reduces Heart Disease Risk By 40%

Blood Pressure -What It Means

Foods That Clog Your Arteries

Swollen Ankles -Causes and Cures

Blue Legs -Top 10 Causes and Remedies

What Is Normal Heart Pulse?

Heart Failure -Know the Top 10 Signs

Triglycerides Too High?-Here Are 7 Natural Remedies

Urine Color -What It Means
Bowel Color -What It Means

Fast Walkers Live Longer
10 Great Ways to Become More Active
Health Benefits of Walking

Drinking Cold Water Burns Calories
Simple Diet to Lose 10 Pounds
Are Diet Sodas Bad for Your Health?

Foods That Shrink Your Waist
Waist Size Matters
Bowel Movements Indicate Your Overall Health
Snoring Linked to Stroke
My Heart Attack-Personal Stories from Survivors

December 23, 2015, last updated June 11, 2016

By Louise Carr, Associate Editor and Featured Columnist

[Health and fitness articles are reviewed by Doctors, Registered Nurses
and other Certified fitness and health professionals]




Giant cell arteritis is a big problem. If left untreated, this
inflammatory condition can lead to blindness or stroke. Giant cell
arteritis, also known as temporal arteritis, is an inflammation of
the artery lining. It most commonly affects the arteries in your
head. On average, there are 17.8 cases of giant cell arteritis per
100,000 people aged 50 years and older, according to a 1995
review by the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.

You’ll need treatment with corticosteroid medication to relieve
the symptoms and prevent ongoing complications. But the side
effects of these medications can be problematic including
osteoporosis and risk of diabetes. Certain natural remedies can
help prevent and treat the side effects from the essential
medication you need to take to control giant cell arteritis.

What Are the Symptoms of Giant Cell Arteritis?

As giant cell arteritis affects the arteries in the head the most
common symptoms are head pain and tenderness around the
temples.
Headaches can be severe and long-lasting. When the
condition first starts it can feel like you’re getting the
flu, with
associated symptoms of fever and fatigue.

Giant cell arteritis also causes jaw pain when you chew and
vision loss – often sudden, and usually in one eye.

A related disorder called polymyalgia rheumatica also causes
symptoms. Around 50 percent of people suffering from giant cell
arteritis also have polymyalgia rheumatica. Symptoms include
pain in the neck and shoulders, and stiffness in the hips.

What Causes Giant Cell Arteritis?

When the inside of the arteries becomes inflamed it starts to
swell. The swelling reduces the size of the blood vessels, and
therefore the amount of blood, oxygen and nutrients that can be
carried to your tissues. No one completely understands why
these arteries become inflamed but it could be down to genetic
factors.

Other factors can increase the risk of giant cell arteritis. Your age
is a key factor – the condition doesn’t usually affect people
under the age of 50. Women are more likely to develop giant cell
arteritis than men, and the condition is more common in people
of northern European descent.

Is Giant Cell Arteritis Dangerous?

It is important to treat giant cell arteritis promptly. The condition
can lead to serious complications including blindness – lack of
blood flow to the eye can result in permanent blindness usually
in one eye but sometimes both.

You are at risk of an aortic aneurysm, which is a bulge in the
main artery down the middle of your chest. If this bursts, you
suffer from often fatal internal bleeding. You are also at
increased risk of
stroke, although this is an uncommon risk for
giant cell arteritis sufferers.

Conventional Treatment for Giant Cell Arteritis

Treatment for the condition involves high doses of a
corticosteroid medication and it is important to start it as soon as
possible to prevent vision loss. This medication is usually
prescribed for many years and you will gradually be able to
lower the dose to just what is needed to control inflammation.  

Corticosteroid medication can cause significant side effects,
however, so we looked at the natural remedies you can take to
help when you are suffering from giant cell arteritis.

Natural Remedies That Help































1. Calcium and Vitamin D Supplements are Essential for Giant
Cell Arteritis

Taking corticosteroids puts you at increased risk of
osteoporosis. In order to prevent bone loss, supplements of
calcium and
Vitamin D are often prescribed.

Studies show that Vitamin D and calcium together have a
beneficial effect for protecting against severe bone loss caused
by taking corticosteroid drugs for giant cell arteritis, including a
2000 study from the University of Alberta in Canada.


[Editor's Note:

Of course, the most plentiful source of Vitamin D is the sun.
Getting enough sun exposure is problematic for those who live
north of the 37 degree latitude, which includes any state north
of Tennessee roughly. For these people, getting enough sun,
especially during the winter months is near impossible.

Getting enough Vitamin D from the sun is also harder if you are
darker skin. Take care to eat foods such as oily fish (salmon,
sardines) during the winter months to help ensure that you are
getting adequate levels of Vitamin D.
Read more.]

2.
But Take Care When Taking Ipriflavone

A supplement used to treat osteoporosis, ipriflavone, may also
be prescribed to giant cell arteritis sufferers.

But according to a 1997 study from the University of Siena,
ipriflavone reduced white blood count in some people, and
should therefore be avoided when you are also taking
medications that suppress the immune system.

3.
Take Aspirin to Reduce the Risk of Stroke Caused by Giant Cell
Arteritis

One possible complication of giant cell arteritis is a risk of stroke.
You can lower your risk of stroke over the age of 50 by taking a
preventative dose of aspirin once a day.

The US Preventive Services Task Force in 2015 says a daily dose
of aspirin may prevent first stroke or heart attack for people
aged over 50. However, you should consult your doctor if you
have giant cell arteritis and find out what is best in your
individual situation.

4.
Exercise Regularly to Help Prevent Bone Loss and Improve
Mood with Giant Cell Arteritis

Regular exercise – something simple like walking or swimming –
can help improve your mood when you are suffering from giant
cell arteritis, prevent bone loss, and help your heart.

As you are at greater risk of
osteoporosis through treatment for
giant cell arteritis, it is particularly important to take a position
where you lower this risk as much as possible. A 2010 study
from the Medical College of Georgia shows that people who
exercised more than 180 minutes per week retained more of
their bone density throughout middle age.

5.
Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) May Help Giant Cell Arteritis
Treatment Side Effects

In theory, people taking corticosteroids for giant cell arteritis are
protected from some of the side effects of the drug when they
also take the supplement dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) at the
same time.

A 1999 study from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in Israel
and a 1999 study from University Medical Center, Stanford
demonstrate these benefits.

6.
Chromium Helps with the Side Effects of Giant Cell Arteritis

One of the problems of taking corticosteroids long term for giant
cell arteritis treatment is it can cause diabetes, probably because
the medication causes a chromium deficiency in the body – a
1999 study from the Oranim University of Haifa, Israel
demonstrated that corticosteroids caused increased loss of
chromium in the urine.

A 1999 study from the Beltsville Human Nutrition Research
department at the U.S. Department of Agriculture showed that
people with
diabetes caused by corticosteroids could better
manage their
blood sugar control when taking chromium
supplements.

7.
Vitamin K Can Help Prevent Osteoporosis Caused by
Corticosteroid Treatment

It seems that taking vitamin K can help prevent the onset of
osteoporosis which is more common when you are taking
corticosteroid medication for giant cell arteritis.

A 2003 study from the University of Maastricht, The Netherlands
looked at 181 post-menopausal women taking placebo, calcium,
vitamin D and
magnesium, or the nutrients plus vitamin K and
found that those people taking vitamin K lost less bone than the
others in the study.





































Related:  
Foods That Clog Your Arteries

Foods That Lower Cholesterol

Foods That Reduce Blood Pressure

Orange Juice Helps Reverse Artery Damage in Chronic Smokers

Eating Fruit Every Day Lowers Heart Disease Risk By 40%

How Much Is Too Much Salt

Triglyceride Levels Too High? -Top 7 Natural Remedies

Urine Color-What It Means

Bowel Color-What It Means

Fish Oil Health Benefits / Salmon Health Benefits

Ideal Breakfast for Diabetics

How to Lose Weight After Menopause/Best Breakfast to Fight
Arthritis/ Health Dangers of Milk

Foods That Shrink Your Waist

How Much Is Too Much Salt? /Sugar-The Disease Connection /
Are Diet Sodas Bad
for Your Health? / Ideal Breakfast for
Diabetics / Ideal Breakfast for Arthritis /Healing Foods Links /  
Foods That Shrink Your Waist /

Snoring Linked to
Stroke

How to Stop Bad Breath

BRAIN HEALTH

DIETS AND FITNESS

HOW MUCH IS TOO MUCH
SALT

HOW MUCH SALT IS IN MY
FOOD

SALT CONTENT OF COMMON
FOODS

150,000 DIE FROM EXCESS
SALT

I HAVE HIGH BLOOD
PRESSURE!

FOODS THAT LOWER YOUR
BLOOD PRESSURE

QUINOA-THE NEW
SUPERFOOD

INFLAMMATION INSIDE
THE BODY

FAT--IT'S ALIVE!

WHY WE GO SOFT IN THE
MIDDLE

WHY EUROPEANS ARE
THINNER


MY HEART ATTACK

CANCER SURVIVORS


MONEY AND BUDGET

RESOURCES

AMERICAN HEART
ASSOCIATION

LINKS AND RESOURCES

Home  >  Conditions  >
Arteries  > Here
COLLECTIVE
WIZDOM.COM

Healthy Body, Healthy Mind, Healthy Life
Custom Search

About Us

Register

Privacy Policy

Meet Our Medical and Fitness Experts

Contact Us

Disclaimer : All information on www.collectivewizdom.com is for educational purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice. For
specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, please consult your doctor.  
(c) copyright collectivewizdom.com 2007 -2016 and all prior years. All rights reserved.

Collectivewizdom,LLC is located at 340 S Lemon Ave #2707 Walnut, CA 91789
Subscribe in a reader
Foods rich in calcium help fight osteoporosis
caused by treatments for giant cell arteritis.