Coronary Calcification -- Causes and
Top 7 Natural Remedies
Related Links
Hardened Arteries?-Here Are Foods That Help

Top 10 Natural Remedies to Unclog Your Arteries

Drinking Hard Water Rich in Magnesium Improves Artery Function

Foods That Lower Blood Pressure

Arteries-How to Keep Them Healthy

Foods That Lower Your Cholesterol

Blood Pressure -What It Means

Foods That Clog Your Arteries

Giant Cell Arteritis - When Your Artery Walls Swell

Orange Juice Helps Reverse Artery Damage in Chronic Smokers

Triglycerides Too High? -Here Are 7 Natural Remedies

What We Yanks Can Learn from the "Free" British Health Service

Swollen Ankles -Causes and Cures

Blue Legs -Top 10 Causes and Remedies

What Is Normal Heart Pulse?

Heart Failure -Know the Top 10 Signs

Urine Color -What It Means
Bowel Color -What It Means

10 Great Ways to Become More Active

Health Benefits of Walking

Drinking Cold Water Burns Calories

Simple Diet to Lose 10 Pounds

Foods That Shrink Your Waist

Waist Size Matters

Bowel Movements Indicate Your Overall Health
Snoring Linked to Stroke

November 11, 2015

By Louise Carr, Associate Editor and Featured Columnist




Calcium is essential and when it’s put to good use it builds
strong bones and strong teeth. But calcium that hangs around in
the organs, tissues and bloodstream can actually cause
problems. Calcium can build up in the walls of the heart’s
arteries – the coronary arteries. When this happens the specks
of calcium are called calcifications. Coronary calcification is
serious – it is an early sign of
heart disease. If you suspect you
have coronary calcification, it’s time to take action.

What Exactly is Coronary Calcification?

Coronary calcification is a buildup of calcium in your coronary
arteries and it is an early form of heart disease.

Over time, the build-up hardens and narrows the arteries,
resulting in a reduction of oxygen-rich blood to the heart.

This narrowing may cause chest pain or
angina. Coronary
calcification can also lead to heart failure if it is not treated, and
arrhythmias, according to the National Heart Lung and Blood
Institute.

A 2004 study from the Tulane University School of Medicine in
New Orleans demonstrates that coronary calcification is a risk
factor for coronary artery disease, even when you have your
cholesterol levels and blood pressure under control. And
patients who died of coronary artery disease were found to have
two to five times as much calcium in their arteries as people who
died of other causes.

Coronary calcification is serious because coronary artery disease
is the number one cause of death in North America, according to
the American Heart Association.

Having diabetes puts you at an especially high risk for coronary
calcification.  Those with diabetes have a 100% higher risk for
coronary calcification, according to a 2001 study by Dr. Richard
Bernstein of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

But it also presents an opportunity – since only 60 to 65 percent
of heart attacks and sudden cardiac deaths can be predicted
using traditional assessments such as the Framingham risk
assessment, which includes
blood pressure and cholesterol
factors, measuring coronary calcification is an important extra
signal according to a 2005 study from UBC Hospital and
Vancouver General Hospital, Canada.

We looked at the reasons why coronary calcification happens,
and what you can do to prevent this potentially deadly condition.



































1.
Eat Fewer Eggs to Avoid Coronary Calcification?

Did you know that eating a lot of eggs increases the likelihood of
coronary calcification?

A 2015 study from Sungkyunkwan University School of
Medicine, Seoul shows that egg consumption is associated with
an increased prevalence of coronary calcification and the
problem is particularly pronounced if you have a low vegetable
intake, and a high BMI.

2.
Drink Coffee as a Coronary Calcification Remedy

A 2015 study from the same institution, Sungkyunkwan
University, School of Medicine, Seoul, shows that in people who
are apparently free of heart disease markers, moderate coffee
consumption is associated with a lower risk of coronary
calcification. The researchers looked at 25,138 men and women
who did not have markers for cardiovascular disease in a health
screening examination.

3.
Take Magnesium to Avoid Coronary Calcification

Taking magnesium supplements may help you to avoid coronary
calcification, according to a 2014 study from Jean Mayer USDA
Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University,
Boston and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

In a study which looked at participants in the Framingham Heart
Study who were free of cardiovascular disease,  a 50mg increase
in magnesium intake as associated with an astounding  22
percent lower risk of coronary calcification,.

This effect was apparently stronger in women than in men.

How can you get magnesium without taking supplements? Here
is a
list of foods rich in magnesium.

4.
Do Calcium and Vitamin D Affect Coronary Artery Calcification?

You would think that eating to much calcium would itself leaf to
calcification of your arteries. But the link is not that simple.

A 2010 report from the Women's Health Initiative and Women's
Health Initiative-Coronary Artery Calcium Study looked at
whether treatment with moderate doses of calcium plus vitamin
D would affect the risk of coronary calcification.

Surprisingly, researchers did not find a link.  However, you
should not go overboard.  The study suggested that higher and
lower doses than the 1,000mg of calcium and 400 IU of vitamin
D studied, could and should be tested.

5.
Statin Treatment for Coronary Calcification

Statins can help reduce coronary calcification but you'd have to
take them for quite a long time. Treatment of coronary
calcification with statins does not result in benefits in just one
year of treatment, a 2007 study from the University of
Pennsylvania School of Medicine shows, but there is a decreased
progression of calcification over a number of years, the
researchers say.

The study looked at 61 patients with moderate to severe
calcification and tested them regularly after setting them on the
course of statin treatment.

6.
Too Much Vitamin A Can Cause Coronary Calcification

An increased dietary intake of vitamin A results in a greater risk
of coronary calcification, according to a 2012 report from the
Center for Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Research, Columbus.

The study tested mice and it demonstrated the bigger risk
associated with "excess" dietary vitamin A intake caused artery
problems.

This study does not indicate that
normal  levels of Vitamin A
cause coronary calcification, however.  Vitamin A is found in
sweet potatoes, carrots, squash, apricots, bell peppers and fish.

There is no need to give up your delicious sweet potatoes and
yams! Just try keep hold yourself to one serving. (Read more
about the health dangers associated with
Vitamin A overdose.)

7.
But Dietary Vitamin K is a Positive

On the other hand, a high intake of vitamin K in the diet is linked
to a reduced coronary calcification risk according to a 2009
study from the University Medical Center Utrecht, The
Netherlands.

Dietary vitamin K is thought to decrease cardiovascular disease
risk because of its protective effect against coronary
calcification. Vitamin K is found in green leafy vegetables like
kale, spinach, and greens, as well as fish, liver, eggs, and cereals.

And of course, if you have diabetes, pre-diabetes or if you have
insulin impairment, you should consult with your doctor and
change your lifestyle to treat these conditions. (Read more
about
foods and lifestyle changes which fight Type 2 diabetes.)






































Related:
Arteries Are the Key to Good Health

Foods That Reduce Blood Pressure

Foods That Lower Cholesterol

High Triglycerides?- Top 7 Natural Remedies

Urine Color-What It Means

Bowel Color-What It Means

Fish Oil Health Benefits

Salmon Health Benefits

Ideal Breakfast for Diabetics

How to Lose Weight After Menopause

Best Breakfast to Fight Arthritis

Health Dangers of Milk

Foods That Shrink Your Waist

Drinking Cold Water Burns Calories

Top 10 Foods That Fight Anemia

How Much Is Too Much Salt?

Sugar-The Disease Connection

Are Diet Sodas Bad for Your Health?

Foods That Lower Cholesterol

VLDL-The Other Cholesterol

Snoring Linked to
Stroke

How to Stop Bad Breath

BRAIN HEALTH

DIETS AND FITNESS

HOW MUCH IS TOO MUCH
SALT

HOW MUCH SALT IS IN MY
FOOD

SALT CONTENT OF COMMON
FOODS

150,000 DIE FROM EXCESS
SALT

I HAVE HIGH BLOOD
PRESSURE!

FOODS THAT LOWER YOUR
BLOOD PRESSURE

QUINOA-THE NEW
SUPERFOOD

INFLAMMATION INSIDE
THE BODY

FAT--IT'S ALIVE!

WHY WE GO SOFT IN THE
MIDDLE

WHY EUROPEANS ARE
THINNER


MY HEART ATTACK

CANCER SURVIVORS


MONEY AND BUDGET

RESOURCES

AMERICAN HEART
ASSOCIATION

LINKS AND RESOURCES

Home  >  Conditions  >
Arteries  > Here
COLLECTIVE
WIZDOM.COM

Healthy Body, Healthy Mind, Healthy Life

About Us

Register

Privacy Policy

Editorial Policy

Meet Our Medical and Fitness Experts

Contact Us

Disclaimer : All information on www.collectivewizdom.com is for educational purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice. For
specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, please consult your doctor.  
(c) copyright collectivewizdom.com 2007 -2017 and all prior years. All rights reserved

Collectivewizdom,LLC is located at 340 S Lemon Ave #2707 Walnut, CA 91789
Subscribe in a reader
Zucchinis, rich in magnesium, help to reduce
coronary calcification.