THE BEST
MEDICINEf-
LAUGH!

FIRST DOSE
There are always two ways
to look at everything, I
guess. My wife and I were
sitting at a table at my
high school reunion last
October, and I kept staring
at a drunken lady swigging
her drink as she
sat alone at a nearby
table. My wife noticed me
staring and asked me, "Do
you know her?".

"Yes",
I sighed, "She's my old
girlfriend. I understand she
took to drinking right after
we split up those  
many years ago, and I
hear she hasn't been sober
since." "My God!" says my
wife, "Who would
think a person could go on
celebrating that long?"


Got a Joke? E-mail it to us:
frontpage@collectivewizdom.com
THE BEST
MEDICINE-
LAUGH!

SECOND DOSE
Last night, my friend and I
were sitting in the living
room and
I said to her, "I never want
to live in a vegetative
state, dependent on
some machine and fluids
from a bottle. If that ever
happens, just pull the
plug."


She got up, unplugged the
TV, and threw out my wine




Continued from         page 1
Alcohol and Diabetes--Do They Mix?

June 16, 2011, last updated July 4, 2014

By Louise Carr, Associate Editor and Featured Columnist
Related Links:
Ideal Breakfast for Diabetics
Foods That Lower Blood Sugar
Ideal Dinner for Diabetics
Directory of Sugar Content in Foods
Ideal Breakfast for Heart Health
Does Drinking Coffee Affect Diabetes -A Comprehensive Review
Why Americans Read In Bathrooms-The Hidden Epidemic of Constipation
Bowels -3 Keys to Normal Bowels
Break Through Your Diet Plateau
How Many Calories Do I Burn
Fiber Rich Foods
Quinoa-The New Superfood?
Fish Oil Benefits-Let Me Count the Ways
Normal Fasting Blood Sugar
My Heart Attack-personal stories from survivors
Fat-It's Alive!
Foods That Reduce Your Blood Pressure
Ideal Breakfast for Losing Weight
Waist Size Matters
Six Pack Abs Step by Step
Americans Are Dangerously Sleep Deprived
Ideal Breakfast for Hypoglycemia




A Diabetic’s Guide To Alcohol

1. Should Diabetics Drink Beer?

Beer has a split-personality when it comes to diabetes. On the
one hand, carbohydrate levels in beer are enough to raise
blood sugar levels. On the other hand, the malt in beer can
actually lower blood sugar levels and help minimize blood sugar
spikes.

One 2011 study from Barcelona University, the Hospital Clinic in
Barcelona and the Carlos III Institute of Health in Madrid
claims a pint of beer a day can cut your risk of diabetes. The
research into 1,249 people showed that a moderate intake of
beer along with exercise and following a Mediterranean diet full
of fish, fruit and veg helps prevent diabetes. If you already
have diabetes or pre-diabetes, beer can improve hyperglycemia
– but this is according to a 2009 study from the Kirin Beverage
Company, a Japanese beer-maker. The study reported that
isohumulones, which are the components responsible for the
bitter flavor of beer, decrease plasma glucose and lipid levels in
diabetic mice. As such, 94 human subjects with pre-diabetes
took either isohumulones capsules or placebo and showed a
decrease in blood glucose levels when they took the
isohumulones.

One beer a day is unlikely to cause you any problems
connected to your diabetes. But keep in mind that beers vary in
carbohydrate content from relatively carb-light lagers and
pilsners, to carb-heavy stouts and ales. Some ales may also be
flavored with honey or lots of sugar so the blood sugar effect
will vary between drinks. (Read more about the health effects
of beer--
does beer raise your blood pressure?)

2.
Red Wine And Diabetes

Red wine, it seems, may offer you greater benefits than beer.
But no one is suggesting you celebrate with a whole bottle if
you’re teetotal. As with all alcohol, moderation is key. What is it
about red wine that makes it appear to benefit your health if
you have diabetes? One 2010 study from the University of
Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna claimed a
small glass of red wine every day could help keep diabetes
under control. This is because red wine contains active
ingredients called polyphenols that help your body regulate
blood sugar levels and guard against dangerous blood sugar
spikes. The results lead some diabetes charities to warn against
overindulging in red wine because its high calorific value
contributes to weight gain, which makes the effects of diabetes
more dangerous.

3.
White Wine and Diabetes

Dry whites and champagnes have a naturally lower
carbohydrate level than sweeter wines, so these would be the
better choice for someone with diabetes. A dry wine may have
around 1-2g of carbs compared to over 10g in a sweet wine.
And fortified wines, sherry and port contain many more grams
of carbohydrates. One glass of dry white wine will probably not
cause you any harm if your diabetes is under control. However,
one 2003 study from La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia
found the equivalent of three glasses of white wine after a carb-
heavy meal caused insulin levels to fall. Study author Anna
Kokavec said “[Our findings] suggest that drinking white wine
on its own after a meal may alter glucose metabolism and
produce a pseudo-diabetic condition [and] … white wine is
probably not a product that should be recommended for
consumption by diabetics.” However, other experts said the
study had no real merit because insulin and glucose levels
normally fall off after a meal and the study should have looked
at people who drink wine after a meal compared with people
who don't.

4.
Vodka's Surprising Effect on Diabetes


























It seems unlikely, but according to a 2006 study from
Biomedical Engineering Institute of the National Research
Council (CNR) of Padua, in collaboration with the researchers
of the Department of Experimental Medicine of the Padua
General Hospital, a shot of vodka a day can help prevent
diabetes. Vodka and other distilled spirits shouldn’t contain any
sugar from carbohydrates. If you have a vodka on a night out,
you should take it with a mixer. The mixer should be diet or
sugar-free and not orange juice. OJ contains around 20g of
carbohydrate in a serving which could cause a spike in blood
glucose levels.

5.
Can Diabetics Drink Whisky?

As with vodka and other distilled liquors, one measure of
whisky every once in a while is not likely to cause you
problems. The danger comes if you drink too much, or if you
drink too much on an empty stomach. When it comes to
whisky, your mixer is important. According to 1984 research by
the University of the Witwatersrand Medical School,
Johannesburg, South Africa drinking alcohol with a simple
sugar mixer (like Coke) caused a hypoglycemic reaction that
wasn’t replicated when drinking the alcohol with a starch-
based mixer. Drinking the whisky without a mixer may help you
avoid a hypoglycemic incident but it will also make the alcohol’s
effects stronger and quicker.

6.
Can Someone With Diabetes Drink Gin?

Again, it depends on the amount of gin, but also the mixer. It
seems that T in your G&T could be causing more problems than
the gin. A 1998 study from Royal Bournemouth Hospital,
England looked at eight people drinking one of three different
mixes -  gin and tonic, gin and slimline tonic and just tonic. The
gin and tonic provoked a greater hypoglycemic response than a
G&T with slimline tonic, which had little hypoglycemic
response.  

7.
Will Liqueurs Cause Problems With Diabetes?

Experts generally agree that alcoholic drinks with a high sugar
content, like sticky liqueurs flavored with mint and chocolate,
should be limited. However, one 2007 study from Tokyo
Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan begs to differ.
Researchers found cocoa liqueur lowered the blood sugar
levels of diabetic and overweight mice, causing them to
conclude that “the dietary intake of food or drinks produced
from cacao beans might be beneficial in preventing the onset of
Type II diabetes mellitus.”

8.
Be Careful With Low- Sugar Alcoholic Drinks If You Have
Diabetes

You should also avoid alcoholic drinks that are labeled low-
sugar or diabetic, unless you control your intake. While these
beverages may have lower levels of sugar, they also contain
much more alcohol. Conversely, low-alcohol wines are often
much higher in sugar than regular wine, so could cause you
problems if you drink too much.

9.
Tips For Cooking With Alcohol

A splash or two of sherry in a dish shouldn’t cause you many
problems. But diabetics may want to cut out the alcohol in their
food, particularly if they are also drinking a glass of wine with
dinner. Try alternative flavorings for common dishes – chicken
broth can stand in for beer in a casserole, apricot syrup or
apple juice can take the place of brandy, spearmint oil can be
used in exchange for crème de menthe. Use beef broth and red
wine vinegar to stand in for red wine, and chicken broth for
white wine.

10.
Can You Drink Cocktails When You Have Diabetes?

It really does depend on the cocktail as to whether you’ll
experience any problems on your night out. In general,
cocktails tend to be sugar-laden and high in carbohydrates.
Which is why they taste so good. Try a plainer cocktail like a
martini, around 135 calories but no carbs - make sure you limit
the number of olives. If you’re making cocktails yourself, you
can cut your risk of blood sugar spikes. For example, make the
mojito with a sugar substitute, and use sugar-free mixers. Cut
out the fruit garnish and don’t add extra cream.


Back to
page 1










































Learn more valuable tips on managing diabetes: Foods That
Lower Blood Sugar -Natural Insulin Foods / Does Drinking
Coffee Affect Diabetes -A Comprehensive Review /
More Related Links
Best Exercises to Lower Blood Sugar
Break Through Your Diet Plateau

How Many Calories Do I Burn

Quinoa-The New Superfood?
Break Through Your Diet Plateau
Magnesim-The Forgotten Essential Mineral
How Many Calories Do I Burn

Ideal Breakfast for Hypoglycemia


DIETS AND FITNESS










BOWEL MOVEMENTS

INTESTINES-KEEP THEM
HEALTHY

QUINOA-THE NEW
SUPERFOOD

HOW MUCH IS TOO MUCH
SALT

HOW MUCH SALT IS IN MY
FOOD

SALT CONTENT OF COMMON
FOODS

150,000 DIE FROM EXCESS
SALT

I HAVE HIGH BLOOD
PRESSURE!

FOODS THAT LOWER YOUR
BLOOD PRESSURE

INFLAMMATION INSIDE
THE BODY

FAT--IT'S ALIVE!

WHY WE GO SOFT IN THE
MIDDLE

WHY EUROPEANS ARE
THINNER

>VEGETARIAN RECIPES


MY HEART ATTACK

CANCER SURVIVORS
BRAIN HEALTH

>CROSSWORD
PUZZLES
>LEARNING
>MEMORY LOSS


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