7 Crazy Good Health Benefits of
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April 3, 2016

By Ariadne Weinberg, Featured Columnist









“There’s rosemary, that’s for remembrance; pray, love,
remember.” These were Ophelia’s words from the
Shakespeare play Hamlet. It may have been a foreshadowing
of her own death, as rosemary was also traditionally used to
place on funeral pyres in those times. However, the delicious
little bush isn’t all gloom and doom. In the 15th and 16th
century, it was also thought to repel evil spirits and cure
thievery. Donning rosemary wreaths was even popular in
bridal wear.

Rosemary is an aromatic plant, with a strong presence in the
kitchen. You probably know it best from rosemary chicken.
Or paired with other herbs in the Simon and Garfunkel 1966
song Scarborough Fair: “Parsley, sage, rosemary, and
thyme.”  

With the formal name of "Rosmarinus Officinalis", it can’t
help but be romantic. The "Ros" in the word rosemary
means "dew".  Linguists disagree about the origins of the
"mary" part of the name, with some believing that it stands
for "Marinus" for the  sea and others believing that it may
have come from the color of its flowers, a pale blue.

Rosemary is common in the Mediterranean region -- Spain,
Italy, and Portugal -- but it can grow nicely in other places
as well.  As a perennial that grows 2 to 6 feet high, rosemary
is a convenient houseplant. If you live in North America or
non-Mediterranean parts of Europe, you can still easily grow
the herb in your house.

Just leave the plants on the deck in summer, and bring them
inside when it starts getting colder. Rosemary doesn’t need
much water, and is indoor-friendly.

And once you have a rosemary plant, there is more to do
with it than just cook.  Here are the Top 7 unusual health
benefits of rosemary:






























1.      
Improve Your Memory Just by Inhaling Rosemary

Ophelia was right about that remembrance thing. We just
didn’t know
how right until recently.

When I read about aromatherapy and how quick cognitive
or emotional effects can occur only by smell, sometimes I’m
a little dubious.

But it turns out that, in the case of rosemary, there is a
scientific explanation.

Rosemary contains "terpenes", small organic molecules that
can easily cross the blood-brain barrier, and therefore
directly effect your brain.

In a 2003 study led by Dr. Mark Moss from the University of
Northumbria, Newcastle, scientists found that rosemary
significantly enhances the overall quality of your
memory.

In the experiment, 144 participants were assigned to one of
three groups: rosemary, lavender, or no odor. They were
not informed of the aim of the study.

Moss and researchers performed Cognitive Drug Research
(CDR): nine tasks that constitute six aspects of cognitive
functioning.

What they found was that rosemary causes a dramatic
improvement of performance for overall quality of memory,
in addition to secondary memory factors.

So, the next time you’re studying for that test or need to
remember where in the world you put your keys, try sniffing
rosemary the night before.


2.  
Shine Up and Grow Out Your Hair with Rosemary

Yes, you can also use this delicious aromatic to bring out
your natural beauty. According to a 1999 study by M.R. Al-
Sereiti from the Al-Fateh University of Medical Sciences in
Tripoli, one of its therapeutic properties includes stimulating
hair growth.

Why? Well, there are some disbelievers of this, but according
to herbalist Ann Wormwood in her book “The Complete
Book of Essential Oils and Aromatherapy”, it works because
rosemary oil stimulates cell division and dilates blood vessels,
which in turn makes hair follicles produce new growth.

It’s easy to make a rosemary rinse for your hair: simply boil
water, add an ample amount of rosemary, and let it steep for
15 to 30 minutes. Then, drain the leaves and let it cool. Use
this rosemary-infused water alone or in your shampoo, and
massage it thoroughly into your scalp. The key is to not rinse
it out right away. Let it sit for a while.


3.
Rosemary Helps Treat Bacterial Infections

Rosemary is a warrior. Rosemary can prevail where drugs
sometimes fail. In fact, rosemary is one of the new artillery
used to fight drug-resistant infections.

In a 2007 study, Suaib Luqman from the Central Institute of
Medicinal and Aromatic plants in India evaluated rosemary
essential oil’s efficiency against mutants of mycobacterium
smegmatis, Escheria Coli, and Candida Albicans (the bacteria
often found in yeast infections).

It turns out that active compounds from rosemary oil are
useful in counteracting bacterial and fungal, drug-resistant
infections.

This has great possible implications for both surgery and
more minor everyday human ailments, such as yeast
infections and foot fungus. (Read more about
natural
remedies to help wounds heal faster.)



4.
Rosemary Helps Prevent Cancer  

Yeah, did we mention that rosemary is tough? It’s a
chemotherapeutic agent. Even better than 007, some might
argue that rosemary helps prevent cancer.

In a 1999 study, C.A. Plouzek and researchers at the
National Institute of Health in Maryland found an extract of
rosemary to be effective for chemotherapy treatment against
drug-resistant human breast cancer cells.

That’s good news for us ladies, and more research may
reveal it to be effective for other types of cancer as well.
Have a sprig of it on your dinner, and protect those cells.



5.
Don’t Cry -- Antioxidize

It’s good for your eyes. Well, sometimes we have to bend
the English language a little to rhyme. In all seriousness, the
antioxidants in rosemary are vision-friendly.

In 2016, Salvatore Chimbulo from the University of Verona
in Italy found that rosemary contains the flavonoid lutein,
which protects against cataracts and
macular degeneration.
Good news for those of us with less than perfect vision.


6.  
Reduce  Pain and Inflammation  

As we mentioned earlier when talking about hair (well, more
scalp massages), rosemary is great for increasing circulation.
So, it stands to reason that this would help excess pain and
inflammation, as well.

Studies have observed the reaction of the active ingredients
of rosemary on reducing these effects. In a 2013 study by F.
Emami at the Azad Islamic University in Iran, they examined
what happened after injecting formalin (clear, aqueous
solution of formaldehyde), a pain inducing substance into
the hind paw of a mouse.

Then they added rosemary and something interesting
happened.  The scientists discovered that the hydroalcoholic
extract of rosemary and its constituent carnosol actually
inhibit pain and inflammation in mice.

A bit of rosemary tea a day could be just the painkiller,
especially for the ladies in that special time of the month.


7.   
Reduce Anxiety and Depression

We talked about how the remembrance plant could jolt your
memory. Well, another great cognitive benefit is that
rosemary can cheer you up.

Besides its potent, pleasant smell,rosemary's active
ingredients can alter your mood. In 2015, A. Abdelhalim
from the University of Sydney in Austraila took constituents
of rosemary, including salvigenin, rosmanol, and cirsimaritan,
and tested them on mice.

The scientists found that rosemary's ingredients are safe in
doses of 50 to 200 mg and to reduce
depression and anxiety.

While rosemary may not soon replace Prozac, it's worth
talking to your doctor about adding rosemary to your diet
and health regime to help combat anxiety or depression.










































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Healthy Body, Healthy Mind, Healthy Life
Rosemary helps to improve your
memory, scientists have found.