7 Crazy Good Health Benefits of
Cardomom

Related Links

Top 10 Herbs and Spices That Lower Blood Pressure

7 Crazy Good Health Benefits of Fennel

7 Crazy Good Health Benefits of Rosemary

7 Crazy Good Health Benefits of Sage

7 Crazy Good Health Benefits of Bay Leaves

Top 10 Herbs and Spices That Lower Blood Pressure

7 Crazy Good Health Benefits of Butterbur

Thyme Is on Your Side - Top 7 Health Benefits of Thyme

Asthma Attacks - Top 10 Natural Remedies

7 Crazy Good Things Health Benefits of Evening Primrose Oil

7 Crazy Good Things You Don't Know About Cinnamon

7 Crazy Good Things You Don't Know About Oregano

Why Won't My Wound Heal? -Causes and Top 10 Natural Remedies

Boils and Styes - Causes and Top 7 Natural Remedies

Neuropathy - Causes and Cures for Nerve Pain

Use Thyme to Heal Boils on the Vulva

Ear Infection - Causes and Top 10 Natural Remedies

Purple Marks on Your Arms -Causes and Cures

Foods That Help You Reduce Stress

Why Do I Hear My Pulse in My Ear?

Why Am I Dizzy? -Top 10 Causes and Remedies

Supertasters-Who Ae They

Blood Pressure-What It Means

Burning Mouth Syndrome-Causes and Cures

Tongue Color-What It Means
June  15, 2016

By Ariadne Weinberg, Featured Columnist









“Where might I have had such an exotic spice?” you ask
yourself. If you've ever tried Turkish coffee, it's the strong
flavor swirling around in there. If not, I suggest you find
your nearest cafe that serves it, and try it right now. Or just
go to your local spice shop and ask for some. Although the
most traditional kind, elattaria cardamomum, has pale green
pods, both green and black cardamom exist. It could be
worth trying both to see which one you like more.





Although native to India, cardamom is currently mostly
grown in Guatemala. You can get it almost anywhere,
though. It is the world's third most expensive spice (after
vanilla and saffron), but it's medicinal qualities make it well
worth the extra cash (not to mention its versatility in
cooking, as it can be used in coffee and tea, as well as sweet
and savory dishes).





If you are prone to an upset stomach, or if plain coffee is too
strong for your system, cardamom is a good thing to mix in
to calm it down. But that's not the only thing it has going for
it. Cardamom has been used traditionally for a variety of
purposes. Although not definitively scientifically proven,
cardomom has been said to be an anti-depressant and an
aphrodisiac, probably due to its active ingredient "cineole",
which gets your blood pumping and circulating, elevating
vital energy.

Let's look at some other uses for cardamom, backed by
studies.































1.
Cardamom Gives You Good Breath

Instead of popping a mint, why not try cardamom?

Cardamom spice has been used as a breath freshener for
thousands of years, since 1500 BC. The ancient Egyptians
used to chew the spice to freshen their breath and to scrub
their teeth, as did the ancients Romans and Greeks.



More recently, in 2008, scientists from India discovered that
cardamom a compound in cardamom called "cineole" is
extremely effective in destroying certain bacteria.


Card
amom's antimicrobial qualities give it special powers. In
2008, Dr. K.R. Aneja and colleagues at the Department of
Microbiology in Kurukshetra University in India looked at the
antimicrobial effects of cardamom on oral bacteria.

Using in vitro tests, they studied Streptococcus mutans,
Staphylococcus aureus, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Candida
albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

Our delicious elattaria cardomomum turned out to be the
most effective against Candida albicans and Staphylococcus
aureus.
Again, the active ingredient that kills these bacteria
and keeps your mouth smelling delicious is cardomom's
cineole,
which is a powerful antiseptic.



2.
Cardamom Helps Prevent Cancer

Cardamom works actively on your cells. While you are
sipping it in your tea (it's often one of the ingredients in
chai, mmm) or munching it in your food (it's present in many
Indian foods, one of my favorite cuisines), it's moving
through your system and keeping you healthy.

Cardamom boosts your immune system and
helps intercept
the chemical process that starts the growth of cancerous
tumors, called "
carcinogenesis".

How? According to a 2010 study by A.F. Majdalawieh from
the American University of Sharjah in the United Emirates,
cardamom has anti-tumor activities.

An aqueous extract of cardamom was found to enhance the
cytotoxic activity of natural killer cells, which means that they
have strong potential to be anti-carcinogenic. What a
delicious way to keep the good cells buzzing and alive and
keep the toxic ones at bay.

3.
Cardamom Helps You Digest Food More Easily

For years, cardamom has been used to calm an upset tummy.
And science is on its side.

Dr. A.H. Gilani from the Agakhan University in Pakistan
examined cardamom's use in constipation, colic, and diarrhea.

In 2008, he and other researchers tested a crude cardamom
extract, using in-vitro and in-vivo techniques. According to
the bio-assay, cardamom has spasmogenic and spasmolytic
components in aqueous and organic fractions, respectively.

Cardamom exhibited both gut excitatory and inhibitory
effects through cholinergic and calcium antagonist
mechanisms.

For the non-scientists among us, this means that cardamom
will help lessen the discomfort of almost any kind of stomach
problem --- cramps, digestive issues, pain, etc.

So, have a little bit of cardamom before or after a meal, to
keep your stomach and intestines happy. Tea and cardamom
after lunch never did anyone any harm.


4.
Can Cardamom Hep You Quit Smoking?


It turns out that cardamom might just help alleviate those
gnawing cravings for nicotine.

Previous research has shown that chewing gum helps
cigarette withdrawal symptoms, in part due to its flavor. Dr.
Lee Cohen from the Texas Tech University wanted to
investigate this further.

In 2010, he rounded up 49 young, dependent smokers for a
study. There were 4 groups: one that chewed peppermint
gum, one vanilla, one baked apple cardamom, and one group
that didn't chew any gum.

During a four week period, the participants abstained from
smoking for 48 hours each week. The baked apple
cardamom and vanilla gum caused lower levels of general
unease and feelings of being dissatisfied with life
(dysphoria), anxiety and tension.

Oddly enough, the peppermint gum had no effect; it was the
same as the no-gum control. This shows great potential for
people quitting smoking. If you are one of them, try the
flavored gum, or even just give chewing on the seeds
directly a go. You never know.


5.
Lower Your Blood Pressure with Cardamom


Stress or genetic factors make hypertension a problem for
many people nowadays. Luckily, there are numerous fun
ways to become less hypertensive. Cardamom is one of them.

In 2016, M. Akhatar Anwar from Quatar University looked at
various studies, and discovered that cardamom lowers blood
pressure.

The main reason that cardamom is so potent in that regard is
because it is a powerful antioxidant, which also causes many
positive secondary effects, not only for blood pressure, but
for overall health. 3 milligrams of cardamom powder was
found to decrease mean arterial blood pressure in
prehypertensive people, as well as lower systolic and
diastolic blood pressure.

In another study on rats, 3-100 mg/kg of crude cardamom
was discovered to reduce blood pressure: a 19 mmHg
decrease for systolic blood pressure( the top number) and a
12 mmHg decrease for diastolic blood pressure( the bottom
number).

If you have chronic hypertension, or even if it's a temporary
condition, try sticking some cardamom powder or seeds in
your favorite coffee or tea. (Read more about other
foods
that lower blood pressure.)


6.
Improve Metabolic Syndrome with Black Cardamom

In our current junk food society, being at the risk of
metabolic syndrome is something to look out for.


According to Dr. Maharshi Bhaswant from the College of
Health and Biomedicine in Victoria University, Australia, black
cardamom can give you a boost.


In one study, scientists examined the relationship between
cardiovascular, liver, and metabolic response in black and
green cardamom in a high-fat, high-carbohydrate diet, on a
rat model of human metabolic syndrome.


The rats were fed this diet for 8 weeks and developed:
visceral obesity with hypertension, glucose intolerance,
cardiovascular remodelling, and nonalcoholic fatty liver
disease.


These factors turned out to be improved more by black
cardamom, whose major volatile constituent is 1.8 cineole
(more than 65% of the entire chemical composition).
The
improvements in glucose tolerance may mean that cardamom
can help improve blood sugar control in diabetics.

So, the next time you're starting a new diet, and still want
some delicious potent flavors, add cardamom to the
shopping list.


7.
Cardamom Reduces Inflammation


Internal inflammation has been linked to many chronic
diseases such as heart disease and Alzheimer's disease.
Yep,
cardamom is anti-inflammatory to boot. And studies show it
has greater implications than simply a lack of bloating or
reduced pain (although, those are benefits, as well).


In 2016, Dr. Luis Moreira Goncalves from the Faculdade de
ciencias in universidade de Porto, Portugal looked at a
compilation of studies, and one revealed that cardamom has
a positive effect on acute lung injury in sepsis.


The experiment showed that cardamom decreases systemic
inflammatory responses, which could be a literal lifesaver,
given that sepsis can be lethal if there is organ failure.


Cardamom is anti-inflammatory due to a signaling pathway
protein complex that controls the transcription of DNA and
plays a crucial role in regulating the immune response to
infection. So, whether you feel bloated or crampy, or are
about to undergo surgery, cardamom could be the best
medicine.











































Related:
Tinnitus -Symptoms and Remedies /Meniere's
Disease-Ideal Diet /Foods That Reduce Blood Pressure
/
Sugar-the Disease Connection /Foods That Shrink Your
Waist / Ideal Weight for Women / Swollen Ankles -Causes
and Cures /Tight Bras and Briefs-Health Dangers /Are Diet
Sodas Bad for Your Health?
Bowel Color-What It Means/ Urine Color-What It Means


Home  > Healing Foods  >  
>>Here


DIETS AND FITNESS

HOW MUCH IS TOO MUCH
SALT

HOW MUCH SALT IS IN MY
FOOD

SALT CONTENT OF COMMON
FOODS

150,000 DIE FROM EXCESS
SALT

I HAVE HIGH BLOOD
PRESSURE!

FOODS THAT LOWER YOUR
BLOOD PRESSURE

QUINOA-THE NEW
SUPERFOOD

INFLAMMATION INSIDE
THE BODY

FAT--IT'S ALIVE!

WHY WE GO SOFT IN THE
MIDDLE

WHY EUROPEANS ARE
THINNER

>VEGETARIAN RECIPES


MY HEART ATTACK

CANCER SURVIVORS


MONEY AND BUDGET

RESOURCES

AMERICAN HEART
ASSOCIATION

LINKS AND RESOURCES

About Us

Register

Privacy Policy

Editorial Policy

Contact Us

Disclaimer : All information on www.collectivewizdom.com is for educational purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice. For
specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, please consult your doctor.  
Privacy Policy.  About Us   Contact Us

(c) copyright collectivewizdom.com 2007 -2016 and all prior years. All rights reserved.
Collectivewizdom,LLC is located at 340 S Lemon Ave #2707 Walnut, CA 91789
Subscribe in a reader
Custom Search
COLLECTIVE
WIZDOM.COM

Healthy Body, Healthy Mind, Healthy Life
Cardamom has anti-tumor properties.